progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

Sufficient Evidence



by Samuel Ehrhart (1889)

sufficient evidence (1889)


Esau Goup.—I say, Elisha, did you ever have any faith in hair-restorers?
Elisha Baldwin.—Why? Don’t I look like a victim of them?


Lazy Curator™ sez: Let us take a brief moment of appreciation for Samuel Ehrhart, the Puck illustrator with endurance. He stayed with the magazine from the 1880s well into the 20th century. I believe only Udo Keppler remained with the publication longer, and that was largely because of that whole “carrying on Dad’s business” thing.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

He Had to Swallow That



by Samuel Ehrhart (1891)

he had to swallow that (1891)


Miss Laymlow.—Really, Mr. Squirmley, I do not think that you had better take me out. You don’t know what a perfect Jonah I am, and always will be.
Mr. Squirmley
(seizing a long-awaited chance).—Oh, Miss Laym—Clara—let me be the whale!
Miss Laymlow.—This is very sudden, Mr. Squirmley. But I have no desire for a three days’ engagement.


Lazy Curator™ sez: Just a quickie slid in at the end of the week here. Since I posted the last edition at the start of last week, it feels like forever since I updated this feature! Not a lot to say about this, except that I’ve been sitting on this one for a long time—as in, years—and I really don’t have the slightest idea why I haven’t posted it before.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

Rather Cheeky



by Samuel Ehrhart (1890)

rather cheeky (1890)


Mr. Rowne de Bout.—That man, W. Fearless Gall, has a cast-iron nerve. Do you know him?
Mr. Vandervelt Roosebilt.—Can’t say that I do. I never met him but once, and that was the day he called to ask me to be his best man at his wedding.


Lazy Curator™ sez: I’m guessing Mr. Vandervelt Roosebilt goes to the same tailor as Albert. Or it was just a silly men’s fashion that Ehrhart liked to depict. Take your pick.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)
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Finally got around to it: the 2016 index for the Weekly Puck. Go back and reminisce on your favorite entries or find new ones you may have missed, and look forward to what 2017 brings! (More artwork from 1876-1917, from the looks of it, he said jokingly and self-consciously.)

2015 index
2014 index
2013 index
2012 index
2011 index

  • Week #1: A Dangerous Flirtation by Bernhard Gillam (1882)

  • Week #2: Unparalleled Adventure of a Nervous Young Man by Joseph Keppler (1880)

  • Week #3: Putting the Screws on Him by Udo J. Keppler (1904)

  • Week #4: Double Lives by Frederick Opper (1889)

  • Week #5: To the Chicago Convention by Joseph Keppler (1880)

  • Week #6: Valentines Social and Political by Frederick Opper (1888)

  • Week #7: Unaccustomed to Capital Society by A. B. Shute (1887)

  • Week #8: A Forlorn Hope by E. S. Bisbee (1884)

  • Week #9: The Magnetic Bunco-Steerer and His Confederate by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

  • Week #10: Twenty Years After by Samuel Ehrhart (1888)

  • Week #11: The Great Rival Advertising Shows to “Boom Up” Stocks by Bernhard Gillam (1883)

  • Week #12: Hard Times by Joseph Keppler (1877)

  • Week #13: Blundering Again by Bernhard Gillam (1883)

  • Week #14: Couldn’t Fool Him by Unknown Artist (1904)

  • Week #15: Future Occupations for Roosevelt by J. S. Pughe (1907)

  • Week #16: A Problematic Expedient by Joseph Keppler (1879)

  • Week #17: Bidding for His Vote by Joseph Keppler (1888)

  • Week #18: A Necessary Precaution by Samuel Ehrhart (1890)

  • Week #19: Building the Ark by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

  • Week #20: The American Mania for Moving by Frederick Opper (1887)

  • Week #21: The Pyrrhic Victory of the Mulligan Guards in Maine by Joseph Keppler (1884)

  • Week #22: Modern Tortures by Frederick Opper (1890)

  • Week #23: Rip van Winkle’s Return by Bernhard Gillam (1883)

  • Week #24: Construction and Combustion—Hint for Our Architects by Joseph Keppler (1881)

  • Week #25: “Blaine Will Be Vindicated in November” by Whitelaw Reid Bernhard Gillam (1884)

  • Week #26: The Fate of a Grand Idea by Frederick Opper (1885)

  • Week #27: Puck’s Pyrotechnics by “Opper & Co.” (1882)

  • Week #28: Our Street Cleaning System by J. A. Wales (1879)

  • Week #29: The Pet of the Monopolists by J. A. Wales (1881)

  • Week #30: Professional Instructions by Louis Dalrymple (1901)

  • Week #31: To the American Voter by Frederick Opper (1888)

  • Week #32: Hints for Preventing Cholera by Frederick Opper (1884)

  • Week #33: Another Matterhorn Catastrophe by J. A. Wales (1881)

  • Week #34: The Universal Custom by Louis Dalrymple (1891)

  • Week #35: The First and Last Meetings of the Anti-Poverty Society by Frederick Opper (1887)

  • Week #36: The English Language by F. M. Hutchins (1895)

  • Week #37: Political Personals by Frederick Opper (1886)

  • Week #38: Just a Harmless Fad by Albert Levering (1906)

  • Week #39: The Usual Thing by Louis Dalrymple (1901)

  • Week #40: A Grand Shakesperian Revival by Joseph Keppler (1881)

  • Week #41: No Gazetteer by Samuel Ehrhart (1889)

  • Week #42: Out Again! by Joseph Keppler (1891)

  • Week #43: Worth Seeing by Frederick Opper (1882)

  • Week #44: He Instituted the Ordeal—Can He Stand It Himself? by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

  • Week #45: The Reformation of Breedwell by F. M. Howarth (1891)

  • Week #46: A Humiliating Spectacle by Joseph Keppler (1881)

  • Week #47: Puck’s Thanksgiving Dinner to the Destitute and Disappointed Politicians and Labor Agitators by Joseph Keppler (1887)

  • Week #48: Self-Protection at Our Boarding House by Frederick Opper (1882)

  • Week #49: The Bitter End by Samuel Ehrhart (1889)

  • Week #50: In Sight of the Promised Land by Bernhard Gillam (1882)

  • Week #51: Some “Children” of the Present Day by Frederick Opper (1886)

  • Week #52: The Great Fair in Aid of the “Grand Old Party of Moral Ideas” by Joseph Keppler (1886)
  • progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The Bitter End



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1889)

    bitter end, the (1889)


    Dr. Cranque.—Here’s a suggestion for the World’s Fair which, if it could be carried out, would—
    Editor.—James, just carry this suggestion out, would you? And while you’re about it, carry the suggestor out, too.


    Lazy Curator™ sez: The page says “Bring the Sphinx Over by Balloon.”
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    No Gazetteer



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1889)

    no gazetteer (1889)


    Hotel Clerk.—I’d have taken my oath that man was an Englishman, and yet he registers from St. Helier, Jersey. Git a guide, Jimmy, and see if it’s anywhere near Paterson.


    Lazy Curator™ sez: “Gazetteer,” that’s a word you don’t hear much anymore. Not with Google™ Maps© on everyone’s phone. Aren’t they still making this joke?
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    A Necessary Precaution



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1890)

    necessary precaution, a (1890)


    Rhoades.—What are you doing with that chart and compass? Going to Africa to look for Stanley’s temper?
    Desque.—No. I’m going over to dine with Bridges to-night in Brooklyn, and I want to be sure I can find my way home.


    Lazy Curator™ sez: More of those fantastic Ehrhart names.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Twenty Years After



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1888)

    twenty years after (1888)


    Pension Agent.—And so you injured your eyesight in the Civil War? In what engagement was it?
    Claimant.—My engagement as a proofreader for the
    Century Magazine.


    Lazy Curator™ sez: Ehrhart’s signature looks different here. One of his early contributions?
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Cause Enough



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1901)

    cause enough (1901)


    She.—People say they quarrel continually, but I don’t know why.
    He.—Why, they’re married, aren’t they?


    Posted without comment
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    No Worse Than Others



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1893)

    no worse than others (1893)


    Mrs. Norris.—You ought to be ashamed of yourself, Robby; you’re the worst boy in the hotel. That’s the third clean dress you’ve spoiled to-day.
    Robby.—That’s nothing! Look at Mrs. Allister; she’s had on four!


    Lazy Curator™ sez: To be fair, if my mother dressed me like that, I’d look for any excuse to stain my clothes, too!
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Pictures in the Fire



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1889)

    pictures in the fire (1889)


    Mama:—Well, what have you girls been doing all the afternoon?
    Mabel:—Watching pictures in the fire, Mama.
    Mama:— Ah! Dream pictures, I suppose?
    Mabel:—No, Mama—pictures of some of Mabel’s old flames, which she was burning. She says she is going to turn over a new leaf and—
    Mama:—Get engaged, I suppose?
    Mabel:—No; get some new fellows.


    You just don’t get girls named Mabel anymore.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    He Agreed With Her



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1895)

    he agreed with her (1895)


  • Good Old Lady—Rum! Yes, the Demon Rum! Just think of the misery it causes!

  • Thirsty Walters—You bet it does, lady! You wouldn’t believe de misery I’ve been sufferin’ fer de last three hours fer the want of a drink of it!


  • Posted without comment.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Not a Mutual Benefit



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1889)

    not a mutual benefit (1889)


  • Emeline.—Alfred, I am very fond of you, but I doubt if I love you enough to be your wife.

  • Alfred.—Emeline, give me, oh, give me the benefit of the doubt!

  • Emeline.—I will, Alfred. Henceforth, all is over between us.


  • Emeline is just holding out for someone less stripey.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The Annual Invasion



    Arrival of the All-Star Argonauts in Search of the Golden “Fleece”



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1905)

    annual invasion, the (1905)


    Posted without comment.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The Bachelor’s Safety Surtout



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1893)

    bachelor's safety surtout, the (1891)


    Bertie Reddimayd.—Why, Clarke! What under the canopy are you walking around in that outlandish rig for?
    Shippen Clarke.—I’m the only man staying at the Bluff House. All the rest are girls.


    ...and it’s not even Leap Year!

    If Puck is to be believed, young, single women of the 19th Century were all grabby, man-hungry lunatics when it came to single gentlemen. No need to even get into the obvious gay subtext of panels like this.

    I totally need to work “what under the canopy” into conversation now.

    Entry 1 of 2 this week, the next coming presently
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Perfect Technique



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1890)

    brilliant technique (1890)


    Kirby Stone.—Your typewriter works very rapidly.
    Willson Deeds.—Well, rather! She was one of Liszt’s favorite pupils.


    Posted without comment.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Determination and Accomplishment



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1879)

    determination and accomplishment (1879)


    I can’t help but notice how much, in the first panel anyway, the subject resembles W. C. Fields.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    A Brilliant Conception



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1888)

    brilliant conception, a (1888)


    Mr. Riverside Rives has at last solved the problem of combining his favorite exercise of bicycling with his imported ideas of style.


    Posted without comment.
    progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

    All for a Dollar and a Half



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1891)

    all for a dollar and a half (1891)


    The captions read:

    Miss Leffie de Rideau.—What can we possibly see in this seat?
    Mr. Nat. Youralist.—Why, a great variety of things—birds, flowers, insects, animals and shrubbery


    This one actually made me laugh out loud. Enjoy!

    More funny theatrics with Sam Ehrhart.

    This post was delayed somewhat as Photobucket was not letting me upload images last night (some sort of server issue, it seems).
    progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

    Recreation



    by Samuel Ehrhart (1891)

    Recreation (1891)


    He starts out for a Charming Summer Resort where he finds—
    —Good Rowing—
    —Fine Drives—
    —Mountain Climbing—
    —Delightful Society—and Hops Every Night—
    —Every Facility for Camping Out—
    and Plenty of Shooting.
    AT HOME AGAIN.
    Doctor.—Young man, you’re run down. Go into the country and get a little recreation!


    This week’s posting is self-explanatory, at least I hope it is.

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