progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

Puck’s Plan to Rid the Country of Two Embarrassments



Give Grant the Surplus, and Let Him Spend It on a Little Court of His Own



by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

puck's plan to relieve the country of two embarrassments (1884)


The LOC says:

Illustration shows Ulysses S. Grant as a king sitting on a throne, surrounded by his courtiers, identified as Rev. J.P. Newman, Henry Ward Beecher, Roscoe Conkling, Jay Gould, George W. Childs, William Belknap, G. Jones, Senator John P. Jones, Simon Cameron, James Donald Cameron, James D. Fish, John A. Logan, T.C. Platt, George M. Robeson, [and] Joseph W. Keifer".


Lazy Curator™ sez: Conkling looks a little puffy here. Off-model, or some kind of commentary?

Needless to say, Gilliam hits another one out of the park. Is there any artwork this man produced that wasn’t amazing?
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

Puck’s Advice Gratis to Some Editorial Shriekers for Grant



by Joseph Keppler (1878)

puck's advice gratis to some editorial shriekers for grant (1878)


Don’t forget your “Man on Horseback”—but your man on foot has too many curs at his heels!


Posted without comment (for now)
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

A Humiliating Spectacle



(See—Gospel According to St. Matthew XXVII, 35—Revised Edition)



by Joseph Keppler (1881)

humiliating spectacle, a (1881)


Lazy Curator™ sez: Can’t be true to my name with this one. The left panel shows James Garfield on his death bed with the Angel of Death hanging over him. The right panel shows Roscoe Conkling and Chester Arthur as Roman soldiers before the Executive Chair, Conkling bearing a mantle reading “Patronage”. In the foreground, Stephen Dorsey (with Star Route helmet), Ulysses S. Grant and Thomas Platt gamble with dice.

This goes into my Top Five of Keppler’s images that would be suitable for framing and hanging on the wall. The use of color in this one is simply stunning!
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

A Grand Shakesperian Revival



(Which we have but little hope of seeing on the stage of the National Capitol)



by Joseph Keppler (1881)

grand shakespearian revival, a (1881)


The LOC says:

Print shows Chester A. Arthur as King Henry IV on a cobblestone street, with Jay Gould and William H. Vanderbilt holding his cape, and accompanied by John P. Jones; he is accosted by Roscoe "Sir John" Conkling who proposes to speak on behalf of Thomas C. "Master Shallow" Platt, behind them are Thomas J. Brady and Stephen W. Dorsey. Ulysses S. Grant and John A. Logan are standing on the left, at the head of Arthur's entourage. Includes text for brief exchange between Arthur and Conkling from "(2nd Part of King Henry IV, Act V - Sc. 5)".


Lazy Curator™ sez: Per my name, I can’t be bothered to transcribe all that text. It’s just Shakespeare with name substitution anyways. Read a book!
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

Another Matterhorn Catastrophe



by J. A. Wales (1881)

another matterhorn catastrophe


Lazy Curator™ is soloing this one without the aid of the LOC. Because he’s all hopped up on over-confidence. Or maybe it’s caffeine?

Image shows Ulysses S. Grant attempting to scale the “Matterhorn Mountain Road to the Summit of the Matterhorn” while clinging to a fragile-looking branch marked “Popularity.” With his other hand, he’s holding on to Roscoe Conkling (holding a staff reading “Senatorial Courtesy”) by the hair. At the end of the rope dangles Thomas Platt, strangled by the neck.

On the far side of the crevasse, James Blaine and James Garfield sit on the cliff, having a leisurely conversation. I unfortunately can’t read what it says on Garfield’s staff.

Maybe I should have consulted the LOC after all?
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

The Pet of the Monopolists



by J. A. Wales (1881)

pet of the monopolists, the (1881)


Lazy Curator™ sez: Sorry for the post-and-run, but hey, General Grant! It must be Sweeps Week here at the Weekly Puck!
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

Puck’s Pyrotechnics



Fourth-of-July Fireworks Free to All



by “Opper & Co.” (1882)

puck's pyrotechnics (1882)


The LOC says:

Print shows a fireworks display with Puck bowing on a stage in front of a "Fan Light" featuring the likenesses of William H. Vanderbilt, Russell Sage, Cyrus W. Field, and Jay Gould; on stage with Puck is a hand holding a smoldering torch which may represent Bartholdi's hand and torch from the Statue of Liberty. On the left is a pagoda labeled "Puck Office" and on the right is a building labeled "Tammany Hall". Among the fireworks are many faces of politicians and other prominent figures of the day, some labeled by type of firework, such as "Chicago Shower", Arthur, Grant, Conkling, Logan and Cameron; "Tumbler", Tilden; "Twister", Schurz; "The Falling Tammany Star", Kelly; "Bomb", Davis; "Junk Whizzler", Robeson; "Polar Rocket", Bennett; "Buster", Butler; and "Star Route Staggerer", Dorsey. Others shown are James G. Blaine, Henry Ward Beecher, Elizabeth Tilton(?), Thomas De Witt Talmage, and Theodore Tilton.


Lazy Curator™ sez: Only a couple of days late on this. “Twinkler” seems to be N. Y. Mayor W. R. Grace. I’m guessing “Opper & Co.” means that a bunch of the Puck staff got in on the fun with this one.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

Rip van Winkle’s Return



by Bernhard Gillam (1883)

rip van winkle's return (1883)


The LOC says:

Illustration shows a scene outside a building labeled "Washington Inn" with an image of the U.S. Capitol on the sign; a large group of Republican legislators, politicians, and others are laughing at an old man wearing tattered clothing labeled "Democracy", he looks dazed, as though he has just wandered in from the past, his walking stick is dated "1861". Two dogs labeled "N.Y. Tribune" and "N.Y. Times" sniff at his heels. Among those present are George M. Robeson, Ulysses S. Grant, John Logan, James G. Blaine, Chester A. Arthur (dressed as a woman, serving food and drinks), Charles J. Folger, George F. Hoar, Joseph W. Keifer, Horace F. Page, William Mahone (doing a hand-stand), James D. Cameron, Roscoe Conkling, John Sherman, George F. Edmunds, John Percival Jones and Thomas C. Platt.


Lazy Curator™ sez: Ah, Gillam, you never disappoint. Some of the expressions here are priceless, Sherman’s and Platt’s in particular, likewise “Little Billy” doing a handstand (still needs readjusting?).

Can’t add to the Conkling in Women’s Clothes tally. As you can plainly see, he gave the dress to Chester.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

Building the Ark



by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

building the ark (1884)

The Republican Scoffers Heedless of Their Only Hope of Salvation



Lazy Curator™ sez: I apologize, but this is another Post-and-Run! Maybe I’ll come back and fill in the info to this one (in the meantime, check the tags).
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

To the Chicago Convention



by Joseph Keppler (1880)

to the chicago convention (1880)


A steam engine named Imperator bears the cigar-smoking head of Ulysses S. Grant on its smokestack. Roscoe Conkling is the engineer, Donald Cameron the conductor, and John A. Logan the fireman, stoking the fires with Solid South Coal.

Lots of other details here. I won’t go into everything but there’s an “Orpheus C Car” bringing up the rear, bearing George Robeson (definitely) and (possibly) W. W. Belknap, James Garfield and George Henry Williams. “G.W.C.,” Carl Schurz and Puck are seen mourning the death of a woman wearing a “Republican Party” sash (apparently having collided with the train). In the background, William T. Sherman and James G. Blaine can be seen on horseback.

UPDATE: Fixed the “wonky scan” problem in this satirical image of President Harrison’s cabinet.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

Lost in the Snow



by Bernhard Gillam (1882)

lost in the snow (1882)

“Oh! Where is the White House?”



U. S. Grant (carrying a broken Grant Boom bass drum) and his buddies are lost in “Popular Vote” snow. L-R, we have: Thomas Platt (with “Me Too” clarinet), John Alexander Logan (with “Logan Bossism” double bass), Grant, Roscoe Conkling, James Blaine (with “Blaine Bluster” horn) and George Robeson (with “Jobs” trombone).
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

Puck’s Fourth-of-July Picnic, 1881



by Joseph Keppler (1881)

puck's fourth-of-july picnic, 1881


Another delightfully dense image from Keppler, similar to this summer-themed one. Some of the featured picnickers include (more or less left-to-right, top-to-bottom):

  • Ulysses S. Grant (upper left, leaning on tree)

  • Carl Schurz (playing toy piano)

  • John Kelly (falling from “Try Your Weight” contraption)

  • Samuel Tilden (using “Lung Tester”)

  • David Davis (the “giant” on “Giant and Dwarf” poster)

  • William Russell Grace (pushing woman on swing)

  • Rutherford B. Hayes (in background between trees, carrying suitcases)

  • Cornelius Vanderbilt (running towards a basket marked “Free Lunch”)

  • Peter Cooper (the rightmost of the two running figures at the upper right)

  • Henry Ward Beecher (blindfolded and surrounded by women, lower left)

  • Thomas DeWitt Talmage (leftmost of the two figures leading Puck by the hand)

  • Charles A. Dana (at the page break, with sailor’s hat and cane)

  • Whitelaw Reid (to Dana’s immediate right, with flowered hat, umbrella and cigarette)

  • James Garfield (on the left side of teeter-totter)

  • Roscoe Conkling (being catapulted from the right end of the teeter-totter)

  • Jay Gould (rightmost of the two figures playing cards, wearing black top hat)

  • Benjamin Butler (lower right, flirting with woman)
  • progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Political Convicts



    by Joseph Keppler (1880)

    political convicts (1880)


    Donald Cameron (bearing a club marked “Patronage”), Roscoe Conkling (holding a “Party Whip”) and John Alexander Logan (with a “Logan Slugger”) lead prisoners representing the various US States in striped prison outfits marked “Third Term” with balls and chains marked “Instructed” into the “Grant Hall” of a prison building marked “Chicago Convention.” Above the door it reads, “The Way of the Transgressor Is Hard.”

    And at last, the final piece of the puzzle that was this image has been found.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Cleveland’s Entry Into Washington—March 4th, 1885.



    by Joseph Keppler (1885)

    cleveland's entry into washington march 4th 1885


    The LOC says:

    Illustration shows Grover Cleveland riding the Democratic donkey past the "Republican R.R.R. Hotel" on the way to his inauguration; he is surrounded by a host of characters that includes many political figures and newspaper editors, including Joseph F. Keppler with his diminutive character Puck. Among those depicted are: Roscoe Conkling, George Edmunds, Augustus Garland, "Hampton", "William H. Barnum", L.Q.C. Lamar, "Grace", "Jones", Joseph Pulitzer, James G. Bennett, Henry B. Ward, Samuel J. Randall, Thomas Hendricks, Abram S. Hewitt, U.S. Grant, Chester A. Arthur, Grover Cleveland, "McDonas", Daniel Manning, George W. Curtis, Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel J. Tilden, Thomas F. Bayard (carrying a flag that states "Public Office is a Public Trust. G. Cleveland"), Joseph Medill, William C. Endicott, John Logan, James G. Blaine, Carl Schurz, William F. Vilas, Cox, Winfield Scott Hancock, Benjamin Harrison, Henry Watterson, and Hermann "Raster". Also shown is Puck's Independent Party and papers labeled "Compliments of C.A. Dana".


    Lazy Curator™ says: I could swear I also see Murat Halstead (who, oddly, looks like Joseph Keppler here, only older and fatter)* and Whitelaw Reid in the crowd, too. And I so wanted to add this to my “Conkling in women’s clothes” tally, but I can’t. Because, strangely, it appears to be Carl Schurz in the dress. Go figure.

    Of course, I could just type “General Grant in his undies” here and my usual readership would see nothing else. Perverts.

    EDIT: The source of the spoof, for comparison.

    EDIT×2: My mistake, that’s Henry Watterson and not Murat Halstead.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Valentines for 1880



    by Joseph Keppler (1880)

    valentines for 1880


    As is usual, Lazy Curator cannot be bothered to transcribe the entire text of these, but will provide some “translation”:

  • U.S.G., of course, stands for Ulysses S. Grant

  • S.J.T. stands for Samuel J. Tilden

  • The flower in “To the Widow” (bottom center) is made to resemble Benjamin Butler


  • This is the last of the Valentine’s Day specials I have managed to wrangle up. For the record, the others are 1882 and 1884. I think they stopped doing them after 1885 (but like I said before, MAD Magazine, who occupied the Puck building, started doing them again in the 1960s).
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The Kind of Canal Business Grant Is Going Into



    by Joseph Keppler (1879)

     photo thekindofcanalbusinessgrantisgoinginto1879_zps20e2ef8d.jpg


    Posted without comment.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Master and Servant



    by Bernard Gilliam (1882)

     photo masterandservant1882_zps5c2fe19c.jpg


    Grant.—“Um, yes, it suits me pretty well; but we must transplant this one (Folger) into the N.Y. Governor Collection—and I have one in mind that will just fit the place!”


    As you can see, Grant is all ready to place the portrait of Roscoe Conkling into the freshly vacated space in Arthur’s Cabinet Collection.

    Yes, I think we all know how well that turned out.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Grant as His Own Iconoclast



    by Carl Elder von Stur (1881)

    Grant as His Own Iconoclast (1881)


    Ulysses S. Grant kicks over a bust of...himself, the words “American Ideal” on its base, set on a pedestal reading “Honor Southern Victory.” He holds a letter reading, “My dear Mr. Jones. We must return Our Senators,” in one hand, and bears bags full of money. He is stepping on a book whose cover reads “Party Spite, Not Spirit,” a crumpled piece of paper reading “Hatred of Hancock beside it. On the wall is a portrait of “Hancock the Superb.”

    A colour version of this image appears on this page.

    UPDATE: A new, full-colour update of this summertime classic is now available!
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Capadura Promotional Trading Card



    by Joseph Keppler (1880)

    Boss See-gar


    Grant: No use talking, the Capadura is the boss segar.
    Hayes: I reckon you’re right, old man.
    Butler: You bet.


    Tee hee! “Segar.” Is anyone else imagining that pronounced on the first syllable à la Yosemite Sam?

    This is the first bit of advertising featured in The Weekly Puck and, in spite of Puck appearing in the lower right corner, the first bit of artwork that wasn’t featured in the magazine proper. This was a promotional trading card that used the images of Rutherford B. Hayes, Benjamin Butler and Ulysses S. Grant to hawk nickel cigars. There’s also a hilarious twist of irony in that of the three men depicted, the only one I could conceivably imagine smoking these is Butler; it might explain why he had a face like a potato. Grant was, of course, a chain-smoker, but I bet he wouldn’t touch these cheap things with a ten-foot pole. As for Uncle Rutherford, well, Lucy wouldn’t let him drink, what makes you think she’d let him smoke?
    progbear: Major-General Progbear (Pride goeth before destruction)

    A Way Out of President Arthur’s Dilemma



    by Bernard Gilliam (1881)

    A Way Out of President Arthur's Dilemma (1881)


    General Grant.—“Don’t be troubled if a few fellows do decline. Here are some friends of mine who never refuse office!”


    Self-explanatory; General Grant offers some of his crooked drinking buddies as candidates for Arthur’s new cabinet.

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