progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

Opening of the New Republican Café



by Joseph Keppler (1889)

opening of the new republican cafe (1889)


Proprietor Harrison.—Wait till the clock strikes, boys, and I’ll give you all a show.


Lazy Curator™ sez: Benjamin Harrison stands before a banquet table laden with food items marked as office appointment positions (as Vice-President Levi Morton mans the bar). James Blaine holds the hungry horde at bay, among them including Jeptha Dudley New, Matthew Quay, Carlton Foster, Jay Abel Hubbell, William Wade Dudley, Stephen Dorsey, Thomas Brady, J. Warren Keifer, Thomas Platt, William Chandler, William Mahone and (hilariously being trampled) George Robeson.

If nothing else, this cartoon allowed me to learn the name “Jeptha Dudley New,” the most absurd and unlikely name to pop up in The Weekly Puck since Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

The Mulligan Guard Lies, But—Surrenders



by Joseph Keppler (1884)

mulligan guard lies but surrenders, the (1884)


The LOC says:

Illustration shows an explosion at the "Claim Agency, Formerly Republican Head Quarters" with William M. Evarts peeking through the opening in the tent to survey the damage; several small kiosks labeled "Machine Republicans Meet Here, County Democracy Blaine Exchange, Tribune Blaine Organ, [and] Friends of Tammany Meet Here" have been blown over and damaged, also knocked to the ground by the blast were "Keifer, [Blaine holding a paper that states "I Claim Everything"], Logan, W. Reid, Butler, Dana, Burchard [labeled "R.R.R."], Robeson, Elkins, Dorsey," and an unidentified man lying on the ground next to bags of "Soap". On horseback, in the upper left corner, is Grover Cleveland holding a scroll labeled "Reform", and a Puck character carrying a standard labeled "Independents", among the ranks are Carl Schurz, George W. Curtis, and Henry Ward Beecher. Strewn on the ground are papers that state "I.O.U. If we win. J.G., I.O.U. Conditional on Success, C.W.F., [and] I.O.U. If you get there, J. Roach"; and several of the downed "Mulligan Guard" hold papers that state "We Still Claim", whereas Dana's paper states "I Give Up".


Lazy Curator™ sez: Bless you, Library of Congress, for enabling my laziness. I’ve had to shoulder most of the burden of research for what seems like months now.

Having said that, allow me to nit-pick their research.

The unidentified man looks like Jay Gould. I was leaning against him, on account of the I.O.U. from J.G. which suggested he was absent, and racked my brain to come up with other, prominent long-bearded men of the period it might represent. W. W. Belknap? William Mahone? Then I remembered the bags of “soap” and made the connection. Oh, that wacky 19th century slang!

I noticed that John Kelly and Hubert O. Thompson couldn’t even be bothered to show up in person. Pity, especially in the latter case, as I know how popular he is with the Weekly Puck’s readership.

Stevie Elkins is in a precarious position. I mean, it can’t compare with this image from [another publication], but it’s amusing just the same.

The eagle-eyed who were good at playing Classic Concentration™ will notice that I’m running out of order, both in the Mulligan Guards series (there’s more than just the two I posted) and in my usual Weekly Puck running order. In both cases it’s to get in a visual tribute (however backhanded—what do you want? It’s Puck!) to John Alexander Logan, what with his life’s legacy (i.e.: Memorial Day) coming up.

UPDATE: Re-scanned this classic image, probably the best we’ve had so far from the Google Books archive, or are ever likely to get. I hear you ask, “Mike, why are you dedicating so much time and effort in the pursuit of finding the perfect scan of this particular image? Hmmm? Trying to tell us something, are you?” Well...um...hey, look! It’s Hubert O. Thompson!

[runs]
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

President Harrison’s Triumphal Tour



by Louis Dalrymple (1889)

president harrison's triumphal tour (1889)


Lazy Curator™ sez: Here we have an image of Benjamin Harrison riding a parade float as unemployed laborers suffer. Also on the parade float we see William Wade Dudley, Renfield Proctor, “Corporal” James Tanner, “Headsman” Clarkson, P. Wanamaker, Matthew Quay and James Blaine. The carriage is pulled by “Law Partner” Miller and Russell Harrison (the president’s son), the latter bearing a note reading, “I Have Dined With the Queen.”

The things I go through just to give you these little tidbits. It took forever to find a decent, non-wonky scan of this. I hope you consider the trouble worth the effort!

EDIT: “De-lazied” it a bit with a bit of updated info, on 7/14/17
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

President Garfield and His Cabinet



by Joseph Keppler (1881)

president garfield and his cabinet (1881)


Lazy Curator™ sez: Self-explanatory, a post to go along with the already-posted depictions of Grover Cleveland’s [first] cabinet and this rather backhanded image of Benjamin Harrison’s cabinet, which is clearly just a pretext to get another dig in at James Blaine. This image, on the other hand, is as “nice” a rendering as we’ve ever had of Blaine, or ever would. Pre-dating his controversial presidential bid probably helps in that regard.

Hey looky, William Windom served in someone else’s cabinet before Harrison! Who knew? Clearly not this dummy! And yes, Robert Todd Lincoln was indeed the son of Honest Abe. He even was considered as a presidential candidate at one point (as seen in this cartoon) but alas, ’twas not to be.
progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

Little Roosevelt!!!



The Grand Old Party Must Be Hard Up!



by Joseph Keppler (1887)

little roosevelt (1887)


The old belated party knights
Equip their hero for the fray—
Yes, they who fought for equal rights
Through all the nation’s darkest day
Their earlier steps would now retrace,
And bring the spoilsmen’s slavery back—
Their only objects pay and place—
Their champion—a jumping jack.


Lazy Curator™ sez: [shakes head] I really don’t know where to begin with this one.

Image shows a young Theodore Roosevelt being placed in a suit of armor. Allow me to identify the rest LOC-style: William Evarts, John Sherman, “Hiscock,” “an unidentified man,” Stephen Elkins, “Porter,” Henry Cabot Lodge, “N. Davis,” Stephen Dorsey and James Blaine (bearing “Credit Mobilier,” “Mulligan Letters” and “Little Rock” plumes, see: “The Plumed Knight”). By “LOC-style” I mean, “Don’t know the full name? Put it in quotes! Can’t identify the personage? Put ‘an unidentified man’ down as a placeholder and forget about it!”

I feel so dirty!

Also, three exclamation points? Really, Mr. Keppler?
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

The Great Fair in Aid of the “Grand Old Party of Moral Ideas”



The Patronage Is Not Up to the Expectations of the Managers



by Joseph Keppler (1886)

great fair in aid of the grand old party of moral ideas, the (1886)


Lazy Curator™ sez: Ignore the posting date. This is technically the last image of 2016, and will appear as entry #52 in the 2016 Index when I get around to doing it (later this week, probably).

Lots to talk about with this image. Who I recognize, from left to right more or less:

  • W. W. Phelps, in a dress, bearing a ballot box marked “Vote for the Most Popular Gentleman”

  • James Blaine, leaning on Phelps’ kiosk

  • George Edmunds offering “Cold Tea and Anti-Saloon Lemonade”

  • John Sherman, in a dress, selling “Flowers of Speech”

  • Whitelaw Reid, in a kimono, inhabiting a tall pagoda labelled “Tribune”

  • Murat Halstead (?) in a blue dress and black gloves, holding an unmarked blue book

  • Stephen Elkins in a green dress, holding a sheet of paper reading, “Please give us another chance.”

  • John A. Logan as a Gypsy Fortune-Teller, holding a grammar book upside-down

  • George F. Hoar dressed as the Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe

  • William M. Evarts, wearing a chef’s hat, running the Candy Kitchen.
  • progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Puck’s Thanksgiving Dinner to the Destitute and Disappointed Politicians and Labor Agitators



    by Joseph Keppler (1887)

    puck's thanksgiving dinner to the destitute and disappointed politicians and labor agitators (1887)


    Deviantart user RD-DD1843 says:

    In the wake of their defeats in 1884 to 1886, Joseph Keppler's "Mr. Puck" serves "cold consolation" and "caustic sauce to various Republican or third party figures. Head of the table is Senator Willaim Malone of Virginia (wearing a Confederate Uniform - he was a Confederate Major General in Lee's Army), followed by James G. Blane (the loser of the election for President in a squeaker), and diminutive Tom Platt of New York State (rebuilding his shattered career in New York Republican circles - in 1881 he shared the end of his then U.S. Senatorial career with Senator Roscoe Conkling, when he was caught with a prostitute in Albany during a special re-election by the New York State Legislature; however Platt eventually was boss of the Republican Party again by the 1890s). Blaine's plumed knight helmet next to him is based on the 1876 "Plumed Knight" speech by prominent lecturer, agnostic, and Republican Robert Ingersoll at that year's nomination convention - which Blaine lost out to "Dark Horse" reformer Rutherford Hayes of Ohio, but the speech became very famous and the nickname for Blaine stuck. Newspaper editor of the "New York Tribune", Whitlaw Reid, heads the back side of the table of losers, followed by New York City reformers Father McGlynn and Henry George - glaring at McGlynn - who lost the 1886 election for Mayor to Abram Hewitt, Republican Senators John Sherman of Ohio and William Evarts of New York (who were Secretaries of the Treasury and State in Hayes' cabinet, but neither of whom could be nominated for the Presidency themselves), and Democrat turned Greenback, former Massachusetts Congressman and Governor, and Union Civil War Major General Benjamin Franklin "Spoons" Butler, who also failed (in 1884) first to get the Democratic nomination instead of Grover Cleveland, and then failed to beat Cleveland.


    Lazy Curator™ sez: Also present at the dinner table: Henry B. Lovering, Frederick D. Grant, Harrison H. Riddleberger and Terence Powderly.

    On the wall behind them, a painting depicting noted publishers Charles A. Dana and Joseph Pulitzer as fighting game-cocks, and another showing The Downfall of Atlas, with Atlas (again, resembling Henry George) having failed to carry a shattered sphere marked “United Party of Labor”).

    This image required substantial surgery, as poor “Little Billy” was sat right in the middle of the seam. He kind of looks a little weird to me still.

    EDIT: Updated, with additional info (which I wanted to include earlier, but I was in a rush).
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    He Instituted the Ordeal—Can He Stand It Himself?

    by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

    he instituted the ordeal can he stand it himself (1884)


    Uncle Sam,—“We have heard from Mr. Cleveland. Now then, Mr. Blaine, you made this issue; it is your turn to step up and—Tell the Truth!”


    elections.harpweek.com says:

    This cartoon contrasts the character and scandals of the two major-party presidential nominees, Democrat Grover Cleveland and Republican James Blaine. When allegations arose that, in his youth, Cleveland had fathered a child out of wedlock, the Democratic nominee told his campaign managers to "Tell the Truth." Supporters contended that his actions after the indiscretion, and following its revelation in the press in the summer of 1884, were both exemplary. Cleveland stands honorably before a jury of voters, one hand in his coat in a Napoleonic gesture. Uncle Sam, rising under an inscribed quote about mercy, taken from an Alexander Pope poem, demands that Blaine now take the witness stand.

    The Republican nominee, however, attempts to sneak away. He is dressed in a garish, checked suit of a confidence-man (swindler), with the pockets stuffed with papers which identify his railroad scandals. The gun on the table, with the tag "Blaine's Substitute Gun-Never Used," refers to criticism of Cleveland for hiring a substitute to fight for him in the Civil War. Blaine served in the Maine state legislature and Congress during the Civil War. Although "Blaine's Private Life" is locked, a scandal would arise concerning his marriage and whether he, too, fathered a child out of wedlock. The cartoonist erroneously blames Blaine himself for breaking the Cleveland scandal to the press.


    Lazy Curator™ sez: I’m posting photos from the election of 1884 again. Wonder why? I don’t usually ask this, but could we have history repeat this time, just this once? Please?
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Out Again!



    by Joseph Keppler (1891)

    out again (1891)


    Lazy Curator™ sez: James Blaine is seen exiting “Dr. Taylor’s” office, a note reading “J. G. BLAINE’S CERTIFICATE of complete Recovery” prominently sticking out of his coat. In the background, Benjamin Harrison and his son Russell look tired and ill.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Political Personals



    by Frederick Opper (1886)

    political personals (1886)


    Lazy Curator™ sez: I could transcribe all that text, but do you really expect me to spend the time to do so? I could identify all the depicted parties, but I’m going to make you do the work. Check the tags for hints if you must. How’s that for laziness?

    On the other hand, I already have next week’s entry uploaded and ready to go. But I’m going to make you wait for it. SUFFER! [villainous laughter]
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Another Matterhorn Catastrophe



    by J. A. Wales (1881)

    another matterhorn catastrophe


    Lazy Curator™ is soloing this one without the aid of the LOC. Because he’s all hopped up on over-confidence. Or maybe it’s caffeine?

    Image shows Ulysses S. Grant attempting to scale the “Matterhorn Mountain Road to the Summit of the Matterhorn” while clinging to a fragile-looking branch marked “Popularity.” With his other hand, he’s holding on to Roscoe Conkling (holding a staff reading “Senatorial Courtesy”) by the hair. At the end of the rope dangles Thomas Platt, strangled by the neck.

    On the far side of the crevasse, James Blaine and James Garfield sit on the cliff, having a leisurely conversation. I unfortunately can’t read what it says on Garfield’s staff.

    Maybe I should have consulted the LOC after all?
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    To the American Voter



    by Frederick Opper (1888)

    to the american voter (1888)

    Will you put a “Power behind the Throne” for the next Four Years?



    Lazy Curator™ sez: Why yes, I believe they would. I certainly hope my posting this image does not become ironic in three months time!

    [sigh] I’m a bad curator! I posted this image out of order, again! It’s the prequel to this one, which I’ve already posted. Oh well! Life goes on!
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Puck’s Pyrotechnics



    Fourth-of-July Fireworks Free to All



    by “Opper & Co.” (1882)

    puck's pyrotechnics (1882)


    The LOC says:

    Print shows a fireworks display with Puck bowing on a stage in front of a "Fan Light" featuring the likenesses of William H. Vanderbilt, Russell Sage, Cyrus W. Field, and Jay Gould; on stage with Puck is a hand holding a smoldering torch which may represent Bartholdi's hand and torch from the Statue of Liberty. On the left is a pagoda labeled "Puck Office" and on the right is a building labeled "Tammany Hall". Among the fireworks are many faces of politicians and other prominent figures of the day, some labeled by type of firework, such as "Chicago Shower", Arthur, Grant, Conkling, Logan and Cameron; "Tumbler", Tilden; "Twister", Schurz; "The Falling Tammany Star", Kelly; "Bomb", Davis; "Junk Whizzler", Robeson; "Polar Rocket", Bennett; "Buster", Butler; and "Star Route Staggerer", Dorsey. Others shown are James G. Blaine, Henry Ward Beecher, Elizabeth Tilton(?), Thomas De Witt Talmage, and Theodore Tilton.


    Lazy Curator™ sez: Only a couple of days late on this. “Twinkler” seems to be N. Y. Mayor W. R. Grace. I’m guessing “Opper & Co.” means that a bunch of the Puck staff got in on the fun with this one.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    “Blaine Will Be Vindicated in November” —N.Y. Tribune



    by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

    blaine will be vindicated in november (1884)


    Chorus of Non-Magnetic Swindlers.—“Why shouldn’t we be vindicated, too? We saw various channels in which we could be useful. We were no deadheads.”



    The LOC says:

    Illustration shows James G. Blaine, dressed like a Roman statesman, standing on a pedestal that states "What are you going to do about it", a phrase attributed to Boss Tweed. The ghost of Tweed stands behind Blaine, weeping, holding a paper that states "Why wasn't I vindicated? I cast my anchor windward too!!" At the base of the pedestal are books and papers, some labeled "20 Years Casting My Anchor to Windward", "Burn this", and "20 Years No Deadhead". Whitelaw Reid stands at center, appealing to Blaine. On the left are various bank officers who committed crimes and got caught, some hold papers that state "I saw various channels in which I could be useful. President Dodd, Bank Breaker", "I cast an anchor to windward in the Marine Bank. J.D. Fish, Bank Breaker", "I would 'sacrifice a great deal to get a settlement' Captain Howgate, U.S.A., Defaulter", "I did not prove a deadhead in the enterprise. A.S. Warner, Albion Bank Breaker", "I received very large sums of money without one dollar of expense. Ferdinand Ward, Swindler". Albert S. Warner was President of The First National Bank of Albion, O.L. Baldwin was a cashier at the Mechanics' National Bank in Newark, Henry W. Howgate (1834-1901) was a Disbursing Officer in the U.S. Signal Service.


    Lazy Curator™ sez: Ah, Gillam, you never disappoint!

    Should I feel bad for wanting to comfort the ghost of Tweed? Don’t answer that question.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Rip van Winkle’s Return



    by Bernhard Gillam (1883)

    rip van winkle's return (1883)


    The LOC says:

    Illustration shows a scene outside a building labeled "Washington Inn" with an image of the U.S. Capitol on the sign; a large group of Republican legislators, politicians, and others are laughing at an old man wearing tattered clothing labeled "Democracy", he looks dazed, as though he has just wandered in from the past, his walking stick is dated "1861". Two dogs labeled "N.Y. Tribune" and "N.Y. Times" sniff at his heels. Among those present are George M. Robeson, Ulysses S. Grant, John Logan, James G. Blaine, Chester A. Arthur (dressed as a woman, serving food and drinks), Charles J. Folger, George F. Hoar, Joseph W. Keifer, Horace F. Page, William Mahone (doing a hand-stand), James D. Cameron, Roscoe Conkling, John Sherman, George F. Edmunds, John Percival Jones and Thomas C. Platt.


    Lazy Curator™ sez: Ah, Gillam, you never disappoint. Some of the expressions here are priceless, Sherman’s and Platt’s in particular, likewise “Little Billy” doing a handstand (still needs readjusting?).

    Can’t add to the Conkling in Women’s Clothes tally. As you can plainly see, he gave the dress to Chester.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The Pyrrhic Victory of the Mulligan Guards in Maine



    by Joseph Keppler (1884)

    pyrrhic victory of the mulligan guards in maine, the (1884)

    “Another victory like this, and our money’s gone!”



    The LOC says:

    Illustration shows James G. Blaine dressed as a knight, the plumes of his helmet labeled "Speakership Record, Mulligan Letters, [and] Credit Mobilier", he holds papers labeled "Aggressive Cash Campaign", and rests his left hand on the head of W.W. Phelps who is holding a sword and a battered shield labeled "Blaines Magnetism". Whitelaw Reid, wearing a paper hat, carries a standard that states "Moral Ideas," (crossed out) "Soap and Success!" Stephen B. Elkins presents a "Report" to John A. Logan and Blaine that states "Great Victory in Maine! Blaine Vindicated! Cost $265,000". Charles A. Dana sits in the lower right corner pouring "Personal Animosity" into cannonballs labeled "Personal Animosity, Spite, Mud Bombs, [and] Malice". Frederick Douglass holds a sign labeled "Mulligan Guards Blaine's Record" that appears to have drawn considerable enemy fire. On the left, "A.M. Clapp" turns his empty pockets inside out and George M. Robeson looks at an empty cash barrel. In the background, there is action at the "Whiskey Arsenal, Fort Cleveland, Polls, [and] Fort St. John", and casualties on the battlefield.


    Lazy Curator™ sez: Frederick Douglass? Well, you could have knocked me over with a feather! Of all the people I never expected to include in this feature! Although probably for the last time, so don’t blink or you’ll miss him.

    Including this for the Logan, on account of the impending Memorial Day, though it’s hardly a flattering caricature (let’s face it, you just weren’t going to find that in Puck’s pages!).
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Building the Ark



    by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

    building the ark (1884)

    The Republican Scoffers Heedless of Their Only Hope of Salvation



    Lazy Curator™ sez: I apologize, but this is another Post-and-Run! Maybe I’ll come back and fill in the info to this one (in the meantime, check the tags).
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The Magnetic Bunco-Steerer and His Confederate



    by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

    magnetic bunco-steerer and his confederate, the (1884)


    Hungry Ben.—“How are you, Mr. Workingman? What!—don’t you remember me? I’m your old friend! Say—just let me put you onto a nice little scheme—”
    Workingman.—“No, sirree! I’ve been there before.”


    The LOC says:

    Illustration shows, at left, on the sidewalk outside a gambling room labeled "Monopoly Club Shades", James G. Blaine and Benjamin F. Butler cornering a "Workingman" and trying to steer him into the gaming room; on the right, sitting around a table with playing cards are Russell Sage, William W. Phelps, George M. Robeson, Jay Gould, and John Roach, and standing is Cyrus W. Field; on a shelf is a bust of William H. Vanderbilt beneath a sign that states "The Public Be D--" and between notices that state "No Straight Flushes in this House" and "This is a Bluff Game - No Limit", and between boxes of "Brag Chips" and "Bluster Cards".


    Lazy Curator™ sez: Hmmm...posting images from the 1884 Presidential campaign? I wonder why.

    W. W. Phelps holding the “Little Joker” makes me giggle.
    progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

    Valentines Social and Political



    by Frederick Opper (1888)

    valentines social and political (1888)


    If You Don’t See What You Want, Ask for It.



    Lazy Curator™ sez: Did I say the one I posted last year was the last of these? That’ll teach me to make such ridiculous pronouncements!

    Not transcribing these, not out of laziness but because of the incompleteness caused by the scanning. I’m sure these bound editions seemed like a good idea at the time, but they don’t make the latter-day librarian’s job very easy, especially when it comes to scanning these elaborate gatefold images. To prove I’m not totally lazy, I’ll even identify some of the personages depicted: William Chandler, W. T. Sherman, James G. Blaine, Carl Schurz, David Hill, Charles A. Dana, Joseph Pulitzer, Henry George, Whitelaw Reid (as a dairy maid!), Jay Gould, John J. Ingalls, Benjamin Butler and William Evarts (as a giraffe).
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    To the Chicago Convention



    by Joseph Keppler (1880)

    to the chicago convention (1880)


    A steam engine named Imperator bears the cigar-smoking head of Ulysses S. Grant on its smokestack. Roscoe Conkling is the engineer, Donald Cameron the conductor, and John A. Logan the fireman, stoking the fires with Solid South Coal.

    Lots of other details here. I won’t go into everything but there’s an “Orpheus C Car” bringing up the rear, bearing George Robeson (definitely) and (possibly) W. W. Belknap, James Garfield and George Henry Williams. “G.W.C.,” Carl Schurz and Puck are seen mourning the death of a woman wearing a “Republican Party” sash (apparently having collided with the train). In the background, William T. Sherman and James G. Blaine can be seen on horseback.

    UPDATE: Fixed the “wonky scan” problem in this satirical image of President Harrison’s cabinet.

    Expand Cut Tags

    No cut tags

    September 2017

    S M T W T F S
         12
    3456789
    10 111213141516
    171819 20212223
    24252627282930

    Most Popular Tags

    Syndicate

    RSS Atom

    Style Credit

    Page generated Sep. 23rd, 2017 04:36 pm
    Powered by Dreamwidth Studios