progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

Who Killed Hancock?



by Bernhard Gillam (1883)

who killed hancock (1883)


Macbeth-Dana:—“Never shake thy gory locks at me! I’ll bet you Five Thousand Dollars thou canst not say I did it!


The LOC says:

Print shows the ghost of Winfield Scott Hancock sitting on a throne in a banquet hall, Samuel J. Tilden pushes a frightened Charles A. Dana, as Macbeth, toward Hancock, Dana makes wild statements while waving around a note for $5000.00; a chalice has fallen to the floor, spilling "Harmony". Samuel S. Cox, as a court jester, sits on the floor next to the throne with "S.S. Cox's Joke Book" at his knee. The room is filled with courtiers, among them are Thomas A. Hendricks, Grover Cleveland who has fallen backwards onto John Kelly, Thomas F. Bayard, Samuel J. Randall, David Davis, Henry Watterson, Abram S. Hewitt, Hubert O. Thompson, George Hoadly, and Benjamin F. Butler; all seem to be sitting in judgement of Dana.


Lazy Curator™ sez: And William Russell Grace, behind Butler.

And a pineapple. Don’t forget the pineapple!

I seem to be throwing you a bone here. Probably because this is the first time in forever I’ve posted an image of Unofficial Weekly Puck Mascot and Breakout Superstar Hubert O. Thompson. And he’s barely in this one! Look on the bright side, he could be like poor George Hoadly. I think this is only the second time he’s ever appeared in The Weekly Puck, and it’s likely to be the last. Probably not even worth a tag. Sorry, Hoadly.

John Kelly’s crazed expression totally sells this one. And wasn’t Gillam a sadist to have him and hated rival Grover Cleveland *gasp* touching?

Yes, I do have the entry for two weeks in the future already selected. No, it’s not that picture of Terence Powderly gazing lustfully at Jay Gould’s plump, shapely buttocks, longing to spank them. Again. That’s from Judge, anyway. Though I do believe that Bernhard Gillam is likewise responsible for that infamous image (don’t quote me on that, though).
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

The Reform Express



The “Practical Politicians” Are Left by the Roadside



by Udo J. Keppler (1893)

reform express, the (1893)


Lazy Curator™ sez: A steam train named the Reform Express is helmed by Grover Cleveland and Walter Gresham (Sec’y of State). Shaking their fists at the train from ground level are David B. Hill, “Murphy,” “McLaughlin,” “Sheehan,” Henry Watterson, Charles A. Dana (bearing a knife marked “Spite”) and Richard Croker.

This image was featured on this Japanese steam engine site, erroneously credited as being from Judge.

The poor junior Keppler had clearly yet to step out of the shadow of his illustrious father. I suppose he had to wait for Dear Old Dad to kick the bucket before he could exert his own will and develop his own style. Isn’t that always the way?
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

The Mulligan Guard Lies, But—Surrenders



by Joseph Keppler (1884)

mulligan guard lies but surrenders, the (1884)


The LOC says:

Illustration shows an explosion at the "Claim Agency, Formerly Republican Head Quarters" with William M. Evarts peeking through the opening in the tent to survey the damage; several small kiosks labeled "Machine Republicans Meet Here, County Democracy Blaine Exchange, Tribune Blaine Organ, [and] Friends of Tammany Meet Here" have been blown over and damaged, also knocked to the ground by the blast were "Keifer, [Blaine holding a paper that states "I Claim Everything"], Logan, W. Reid, Butler, Dana, Burchard [labeled "R.R.R."], Robeson, Elkins, Dorsey," and an unidentified man lying on the ground next to bags of "Soap". On horseback, in the upper left corner, is Grover Cleveland holding a scroll labeled "Reform", and a Puck character carrying a standard labeled "Independents", among the ranks are Carl Schurz, George W. Curtis, and Henry Ward Beecher. Strewn on the ground are papers that state "I.O.U. If we win. J.G., I.O.U. Conditional on Success, C.W.F., [and] I.O.U. If you get there, J. Roach"; and several of the downed "Mulligan Guard" hold papers that state "We Still Claim", whereas Dana's paper states "I Give Up".


Lazy Curator™ sez: Bless you, Library of Congress, for enabling my laziness. I’ve had to shoulder most of the burden of research for what seems like months now.

Having said that, allow me to nit-pick their research.

The unidentified man looks like Jay Gould. I was leaning against him, on account of the I.O.U. from J.G. which suggested he was absent, and racked my brain to come up with other, prominent long-bearded men of the period it might represent. W. W. Belknap? William Mahone? Then I remembered the bags of “soap” and made the connection. Oh, that wacky 19th century slang!

I noticed that John Kelly and Hubert O. Thompson couldn’t even be bothered to show up in person. Pity, especially in the latter case, as I know how popular he is with the Weekly Puck’s readership.

Stevie Elkins is in a precarious position. I mean, it can’t compare with this image from [another publication], but it’s amusing just the same.

The eagle-eyed who were good at playing Classic Concentration™ will notice that I’m running out of order, both in the Mulligan Guards series (there’s more than just the two I posted) and in my usual Weekly Puck running order. In both cases it’s to get in a visual tribute (however backhanded—what do you want? It’s Puck!) to John Alexander Logan, what with his life’s legacy (i.e.: Memorial Day) coming up.

UPDATE: Re-scanned this classic image, probably the best we’ve had so far from the Google Books archive, or are ever likely to get. I hear you ask, “Mike, why are you dedicating so much time and effort in the pursuit of finding the perfect scan of this particular image? Hmmm? Trying to tell us something, are you?” Well...um...hey, look! It’s Hubert O. Thompson!

[runs]
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

Her True Knight



by Joseph Keppler (1887)

her true knight (1887)


Lazy Curator™ sez: Click through and enlarge all that damn text your own damn self!

Here we see Democratic Party Elsa being romanced by “Lohengrin” Cleveland, facing off against rival “Telramund” Hill and his advisor “Ortrud” Pulitzer. Behind them is a “Mugwump” swan and banners reading “Jacksonian Bourbons,” “Heelers and Spoilsmen” and “Reform Is a Humbug and a Fraud.”

I hate to keep obsessing on this single issue, but I had to post this to prove I wasn’t going nuts in my old age and that the elder Keppler had, in fact, depicted David Bennett Hill. He has. Here’s proof. Moving on...

Now that I’ve posted this, I can’t help but marvel at how much Elsa resembles Kate Bush.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

In Sight of the Promised Land



by Bernhard Gillam (1882)

in sight of the promised land (1882)


Lazy Curator™ sez: First of all, let me apologize for the clunky seam on this one. This was the only full-sized image where both sides were in color that I could find. Image shows Grover Cleveland leading pilgrims to the Capitol, marked 1884. Some of those pictured: Charles A. Dana and Henry Watterson (blowing horns), L. Q. C. Lamar (crawling on the rock), Samuel Tilden (riding piggy-back), Allen Thurman, Thomas Bayard, John Kelly (leopard-skin is a good look for him!) and Benjamin Butler.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

He Instituted the Ordeal—Can He Stand It Himself?

by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

he instituted the ordeal can he stand it himself (1884)


Uncle Sam,—“We have heard from Mr. Cleveland. Now then, Mr. Blaine, you made this issue; it is your turn to step up and—Tell the Truth!”


elections.harpweek.com says:

This cartoon contrasts the character and scandals of the two major-party presidential nominees, Democrat Grover Cleveland and Republican James Blaine. When allegations arose that, in his youth, Cleveland had fathered a child out of wedlock, the Democratic nominee told his campaign managers to "Tell the Truth." Supporters contended that his actions after the indiscretion, and following its revelation in the press in the summer of 1884, were both exemplary. Cleveland stands honorably before a jury of voters, one hand in his coat in a Napoleonic gesture. Uncle Sam, rising under an inscribed quote about mercy, taken from an Alexander Pope poem, demands that Blaine now take the witness stand.

The Republican nominee, however, attempts to sneak away. He is dressed in a garish, checked suit of a confidence-man (swindler), with the pockets stuffed with papers which identify his railroad scandals. The gun on the table, with the tag "Blaine's Substitute Gun-Never Used," refers to criticism of Cleveland for hiring a substitute to fight for him in the Civil War. Blaine served in the Maine state legislature and Congress during the Civil War. Although "Blaine's Private Life" is locked, a scandal would arise concerning his marriage and whether he, too, fathered a child out of wedlock. The cartoonist erroneously blames Blaine himself for breaking the Cleveland scandal to the press.


Lazy Curator™ sez: I’m posting photos from the election of 1884 again. Wonder why? I don’t usually ask this, but could we have history repeat this time, just this once? Please?
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

Danksagung Tag 1885.



by Joseph Keppler (1885)

Danksagung Tag 1885


Sequel image to this image and this one. President Cleveland and his cabinet around the Thanksgiving dinner table, being presented a (unplucked, possibly live) turkey borne by Puck with a tag attached reading “With Compliments of All Good Citizens.” Around the table, clockwise from top left:

  • W. F. Vilas

  • William Crowninshield Endicott

  • W. C. Whitney

  • A. H. Garland

  • Grover Cleveland

  • Thomas Bayard

  • Daniel Manning

  • Lucius Q. C. Lamar


  • When I discovered that Mr. Endicott’s middle name was Crowninshield, I just had to share that information. Probably the most flattering image of Mr. Bayard that has ever appeared in Puck’s pages, or ever would.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    President Cleveland and His Cabinet



    by Joseph Keppler (1885)

    president cleveland and his cabinet (1885)


    This isn’t the image I originally planned to post. I’d originally planned the one of Cleveland’s 1893 cabinet, but I had to switch it around. I just could not deny you the fabulousness of Mr. Endicott’s moustache. Compare this image to Keppler’s rendering of Benjamin Harrison’s cabinet, which is really a pretext to get in another dig at James Blaine.

    Mr. Whitney has appeared in The Weekly Puck before (here, to be precise), as has Mr. Bayard (too many times to count).
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Cleveland’s Entry Into Washington—March 4th, 1885.



    by Joseph Keppler (1885)

    cleveland's entry into washington march 4th 1885


    The LOC says:

    Illustration shows Grover Cleveland riding the Democratic donkey past the "Republican R.R.R. Hotel" on the way to his inauguration; he is surrounded by a host of characters that includes many political figures and newspaper editors, including Joseph F. Keppler with his diminutive character Puck. Among those depicted are: Roscoe Conkling, George Edmunds, Augustus Garland, "Hampton", "William H. Barnum", L.Q.C. Lamar, "Grace", "Jones", Joseph Pulitzer, James G. Bennett, Henry B. Ward, Samuel J. Randall, Thomas Hendricks, Abram S. Hewitt, U.S. Grant, Chester A. Arthur, Grover Cleveland, "McDonas", Daniel Manning, George W. Curtis, Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel J. Tilden, Thomas F. Bayard (carrying a flag that states "Public Office is a Public Trust. G. Cleveland"), Joseph Medill, William C. Endicott, John Logan, James G. Blaine, Carl Schurz, William F. Vilas, Cox, Winfield Scott Hancock, Benjamin Harrison, Henry Watterson, and Hermann "Raster". Also shown is Puck's Independent Party and papers labeled "Compliments of C.A. Dana".


    Lazy Curator™ says: I could swear I also see Murat Halstead (who, oddly, looks like Joseph Keppler here, only older and fatter)* and Whitelaw Reid in the crowd, too. And I so wanted to add this to my “Conkling in women’s clothes” tally, but I can’t. Because, strangely, it appears to be Carl Schurz in the dress. Go figure.

    Of course, I could just type “General Grant in his undies” here and my usual readership would see nothing else. Perverts.

    EDIT: The source of the spoof, for comparison.

    EDIT×2: My mistake, that’s Henry Watterson and not Murat Halstead.

    EDIT×3: And how did I forget Bernhard Gillam behind Keppler and Puck there?
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The New Leader and the Old Chorus



    by Bernhard Gillam (1885)

    new leader and the old chorus, the (1885)


    The LOC sez:

    Illustration shows John Logan labeled "New Leader" of the Republican Party, the "party of Reform and Puritee", holding a paper that states "Logan Speec[h] at Boston July 1885", standing in the street between the White House and the U.S. Treasury, leading a chorus of tramps identified as "J. Gould, Field, Mahone, Roach, Riddleberger, T. Platt, Ex leader [James G. Blaine], Robeson, Keifer, Chandler, Brady, [and] Dorsey", and an unidentified blind man who looks like Benjamin F. Butler; some carry battered hand-pails labeled "Empty Hopes". On the U.S. Treasury is a sign "Notice No Tramps" and on the White House, where President Cleveland is leaning out a window, is another sign that states "No Tramps Admitted". Uncle Sam, as a policeman, is leaning against the wall.


    Lazy Curator™ sez: Bless you, LOC, for making my job easy. They don’t call me “Lazy Curator” for nothing!

    Hmmm...has Logan put on weight since ’84, or is this another one we can chalk up to “off-model”?

    William Mahone tag added. It was overdue.
    progbear: Major-General Progbear (My handlebar)
    Another self portrait from the streets of Berkeley. Enjoy it, it’s your last of 2013:

     photo CAM00406_zps75f4758b.jpg


    Haven’t done too much with the upcoming Movie Explorer episode. Well, when I was waiting for a taping opportunity for the last episode, I wrote a large part of a long and protracted intro, but I haven’t worked on it since then. In the meantime, I did post Myra, finally. Unsurprisingly, it’s a popular one (for me).

    In other news, look what [livejournal.com profile] albadger got me for [insert name of wintertime holiday here]:

    What could it be? )
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The Political Courtney



    by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

    political courtney, the (1884)


    LOGAN.—“Come, Jim, show some nerve, or nobody won’t believe you’re in the race! Ain’t you never gonna be Aggressive?”


    Another ribbing at the expense of James Blaine and his presidential campaign of 1884. His running mate John Logan tries in vain to get him in the boat race, as (among others) W. W. Phelps, George Robeson, Whitelaw Reid (bearing a “Tribune Sponge”), Jay Gould and Stephen Elkins attend to him. Behind him, Stephen Dorsey bears oars marked “Soap” and “★ Router.” Meanwhile in the background, Grover Cleveland is off and running, alone (with Carl Schurz standing at the dock of the Independent Boat House).

    Blaine has great “comedy” eyes in this image. Note also Ben Butler as a duck, lower right. And another sighting of Blaine’s tattoos.
    progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

    Puck’s Review of the Past Year



    by Joseph Keppler (1884)

    puck's review of the past year (1884)


    A sort of “Puck’s Greatest Hits,” 1884-style. You’ll probably recognize this cartoon in there and this one. I like ones like this, where you get to see one artist’s different interpretation of someone else’s work (both those cartoons in question were originally by Bernhard Gillam).
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    A Moment of Anxiety



    Who Is Going to Get Left?



    by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

    moment of anxiety, a (1884)


    Grover “Santa Claus” Cleveland, his toy sack filled with cabinet positions, enters a nursery filled with Democratic politicians. Note the sign reading “Christmas Comes Once Every 20 Years” and Tammany’s John Kelly as a cat.

    Two of Cleveland’s actual eventual (first-term) cabinet members are depicted here: L. Q. C. Lamar (bearded man in the background, far left, wearing a nightcap) and Thomas Bayard (foreground left, in bed with knees up to his chin). Also readily identifiable by Lazy Curator™: Samuel Tilden (sleeping peacefully in the bed next to the doorway), Samuel S. Cox (bearded man facing forwards in second bed from foreground) Carl Schurz (in cradle marked “Independence”), Allen Thurman (wearing red nightcap in front of clock), Henry Watterson (far right, in front of the clock) and Abram S. Hewitt (in front of Thurman and Watterson).

    I suppose I should consider myself grateful for the delay in updating this feature, as this image is far more relevant this week than it would have been two weeks ago! Think of it as a companion image to this one.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Thanksgiving Day, 1884



    by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

    thanksgiving day, 1884

    “Let Us Be Thankful!”



    Grover Cleveland walks past carrying a turkey marked “Presidency” as his political rivals dine on crow. Those I can identify definitively: James Blaine (seated, far left), W. W. Phelps (standing, behind Blaine, apparently acting as a waiter), George Robeson (seated, behind table, holding knife and fork), Stephen W. Dorsey (standing, behind Robeson), William Mahone (standing—yes, really—to the left of Dorsey), Henry Cabot Lodge (seated, between Blaine and Robeson), Whitelaw Reid (standing, center, holding tray lid), Stephen Elkins (seated, to the right of Reid, holding his head), Charles A. Dana (seated, far right), Ben Butler (seated, right foreground), John Alexander Logan (seated, left foreground), Cyrus Field (standing, with elbow out of window), Thomas Platt (standing, to the left of Field) and Roscoe Conkling (peering through the doorway). I believe the dog represents John Kelly. Jay Gould can be seen leaning out of a window across the street bearing a sign reading “My congratulations.”

    I went out of my usual running order to force this one because it was seasonally appropriate. In other words: two “comic-y” panels over the next two weeks.

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