progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

Wanted, a Leader



The Labor-Agitation Orchestra on the Go-As-You-Please Plan



by Frederick Opper (1886)

wanted, a leader (1886)


The good folk at explorepahistory.com say:

As one of the nation's most popular political idealists, Henry George was the subject of constant derision by the mainstream press, including this Puck cartoon in which George plays on his Bass-Less Theories, in a Benefit Concert for the Improvement of the Laborer's Condition that includes the Anarchist Press on trombone, Knights of Labor President Terence Powderly on harp, and the American Federation of Labor on cymbals.


Lazy Curator™ sez: And featuring Dr. McGlynn (seen also in this image) on violin!

Happy Labor Day, everyone!
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

“Me Too!”



by Frederick Opper (1881)

me too (1881)


Lazy Curator™ sez: Image shows Roscoe Conkling as a medieval troubadour strumming a lute under a balcony labelled “Canonchet.” Behind him we see Thomas Platt, similarly attired in comically oversized shoes and given a boost by a sturdy suitcase, doing the same under a balcony marked “Albany.” Also: the moon has a face.

The more of these I do, the more I link the public figures with their running gags: Platt and his “Me too!”, Conkling and his women’s clothes, James Blaine and his tattoos, Benjamin Harrison being engulfed by his grandfather’s hat, etc. etc.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

The Age of Accommodation



by Frederick Opper (1885)

age of accomodation, the (1885)


Photographer.—“The negative is simply superb. Now—er—how many years back would you like to have it retouched?”


Lazy Curator™ sez: I like the sign on the wall: “Try Our Electric Lithographs and Look Lovely.”

Beware the Google™ Books© click-through. “Some Warm Summers,” the story on the same page (and its accompanying caricature) will make you cringe!
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

The Cantankerous College Youth



by Frederick Burr Opper (1882)

cantankerous college youth, the (1882)


The Way It Is Now—“Look out! here come the students!”
The Way It Ought to Be—The towns people to the front, or rather to the rear.


Lazy Curator™ sez: Here’s as good a place as any to post this:

progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

Untitled (Valentines for 1891)



by Frederick Opper (1891)

valentines 1891


Lazy Curator™ sez: Opper was only lavishing us with a mere four Valentines this year. I’m guessing his disaffection with Puck was beginning to show, and he had one foot out the door.

What we have here: William McKinley as “A Hayseed Hasbeen,” John James Ingalls as “An Unheeded Shrew,” William M. Evarts as “A Back-Number” and David Hill as “An Ambitious Boy.”

As usual, my title precludes me from transcribing any more text than that. Deal with it!
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)
Puck Banner


Finally got around to it: the 2016 index for the Weekly Puck. Go back and reminisce on your favorite entries or find new ones you may have missed, and look forward to what 2017 brings! (More artwork from 1876-1917, from the looks of it, he said jokingly and self-consciously.)

2015 index
2014 index
2013 index
2012 index
2011 index

  • Week #1: A Dangerous Flirtation by Bernhard Gillam (1882)

  • Week #2: Unparalleled Adventure of a Nervous Young Man by Joseph Keppler (1880)

  • Week #3: Putting the Screws on Him by Udo J. Keppler (1904)

  • Week #4: Double Lives by Frederick Opper (1889)

  • Week #5: To the Chicago Convention by Joseph Keppler (1880)

  • Week #6: Valentines Social and Political by Frederick Opper (1888)

  • Week #7: Unaccustomed to Capital Society by A. B. Shute (1887)

  • Week #8: A Forlorn Hope by E. S. Bisbee (1884)

  • Week #9: The Magnetic Bunco-Steerer and His Confederate by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

  • Week #10: Twenty Years After by Samuel Ehrhart (1888)

  • Week #11: The Great Rival Advertising Shows to “Boom Up” Stocks by Bernhard Gillam (1883)

  • Week #12: Hard Times by Joseph Keppler (1877)

  • Week #13: Blundering Again by Bernhard Gillam (1883)

  • Week #14: Couldn’t Fool Him by Unknown Artist (1904)

  • Week #15: Future Occupations for Roosevelt by J. S. Pughe (1907)

  • Week #16: A Problematic Expedient by Joseph Keppler (1879)

  • Week #17: Bidding for His Vote by Joseph Keppler (1888)

  • Week #18: A Necessary Precaution by Samuel Ehrhart (1890)

  • Week #19: Building the Ark by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

  • Week #20: The American Mania for Moving by Frederick Opper (1887)

  • Week #21: The Pyrrhic Victory of the Mulligan Guards in Maine by Joseph Keppler (1884)

  • Week #22: Modern Tortures by Frederick Opper (1890)

  • Week #23: Rip van Winkle’s Return by Bernhard Gillam (1883)

  • Week #24: Construction and Combustion—Hint for Our Architects by Joseph Keppler (1881)

  • Week #25: “Blaine Will Be Vindicated in November” by Whitelaw Reid Bernhard Gillam (1884)

  • Week #26: The Fate of a Grand Idea by Frederick Opper (1885)

  • Week #27: Puck’s Pyrotechnics by “Opper & Co.” (1882)

  • Week #28: Our Street Cleaning System by J. A. Wales (1879)

  • Week #29: The Pet of the Monopolists by J. A. Wales (1881)

  • Week #30: Professional Instructions by Louis Dalrymple (1901)

  • Week #31: To the American Voter by Frederick Opper (1888)

  • Week #32: Hints for Preventing Cholera by Frederick Opper (1884)

  • Week #33: Another Matterhorn Catastrophe by J. A. Wales (1881)

  • Week #34: The Universal Custom by Louis Dalrymple (1891)

  • Week #35: The First and Last Meetings of the Anti-Poverty Society by Frederick Opper (1887)

  • Week #36: The English Language by F. M. Hutchins (1895)

  • Week #37: Political Personals by Frederick Opper (1886)

  • Week #38: Just a Harmless Fad by Albert Levering (1906)

  • Week #39: The Usual Thing by Louis Dalrymple (1901)

  • Week #40: A Grand Shakesperian Revival by Joseph Keppler (1881)

  • Week #41: No Gazetteer by Samuel Ehrhart (1889)

  • Week #42: Out Again! by Joseph Keppler (1891)

  • Week #43: Worth Seeing by Frederick Opper (1882)

  • Week #44: He Instituted the Ordeal—Can He Stand It Himself? by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

  • Week #45: The Reformation of Breedwell by F. M. Howarth (1891)

  • Week #46: A Humiliating Spectacle by Joseph Keppler (1881)

  • Week #47: Puck’s Thanksgiving Dinner to the Destitute and Disappointed Politicians and Labor Agitators by Joseph Keppler (1887)

  • Week #48: Self-Protection at Our Boarding House by Frederick Opper (1882)

  • Week #49: The Bitter End by Samuel Ehrhart (1889)

  • Week #50: In Sight of the Promised Land by Bernhard Gillam (1882)

  • Week #51: Some “Children” of the Present Day by Frederick Opper (1886)

  • Week #52: The Great Fair in Aid of the “Grand Old Party of Moral Ideas” by Joseph Keppler (1886)
  • progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Some “Children” of the Present Day



    by Frederick Opper (1886)

    some children of the present day (1886)


    Santa Claus.—“Well, they don’t seem to have much use for me! They’re like a lot of little old men and women! If they’re going to get like this, I may as well retire from business!”


    Lazy Curator™ sez: O dear! I wonder who the horribly racist toy is intended for?
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Self-Protection at Our Boarding-House



    by Frederick Opper (1882)

    self-protection at our boarding house (1882)


    Desperate Boarder:—“There! I guess I can go out for half an hour and find everything here when I come back!”


    Lazy Curator™ sez: As someone who’s spent the past three years in seasonal dorms, let me tell you, I relate to this image!
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Worth Seeing



    by Frederick Opper (1882)

    worth seeing (1882)


    Stranger in the City:—“That really is a curiosity; I’ll go in and look at him!”


    Lazy Curator™ sez: This “dime museum” nostalgia is the most Halloween-appropriate image I could find on such short notice. Enjoy!
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The First and Last Meetings of the Anti-Poverty Society



    by Frederick Opper (1887)

    first and last meetings of the anti-poverty society, the (1887)


    Lazy Curator™ sez: Sorry, but I fear I must Post-And-Run™ again today. Further discussion on this one will have to wait until another day.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Hints for Preventing Cholera



    by Frederick Opper (1884)

    hints for preventing cholera (1884)


  • Bathe frequently, even if it takes an effort of will-power to do it.

  • Let certain kinds of fruit alone. [Such as the above.]

  • Beware the deadly ice-cream. [Young men may send tokens of gratitude to this office.]

  • Avoid violent exercise [Ask your boarding house landlady to cut your steak for you.]

  • Don’t indulge in too much tobacco. If you
  • must smoke, borrow a cigar from a friend.
  • Don’t walk too rapidly. District Telegraph boys never have cholera.


  • Lazy Curator™ sez: I was extra-lazy last week, and owe you an extra. Which is coming...in a few moments. Have faith and be patient.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    To the American Voter



    by Frederick Opper (1888)

    to the american voter (1888)

    Will you put a “Power behind the Throne” for the next Four Years?



    Lazy Curator™ sez: Why yes, I believe they would. I certainly hope my posting this image does not become ironic in three months time!

    [sigh] I’m a bad curator! I posted this image out of order, again! It’s the prequel to this one, which I’ve already posted. Oh well! Life goes on!
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Puck’s Pyrotechnics



    Fourth-of-July Fireworks Free to All



    by “Opper & Co.” (1882)

    puck's pyrotechnics (1882)


    The LOC says:

    Print shows a fireworks display with Puck bowing on a stage in front of a "Fan Light" featuring the likenesses of William H. Vanderbilt, Russell Sage, Cyrus W. Field, and Jay Gould; on stage with Puck is a hand holding a smoldering torch which may represent Bartholdi's hand and torch from the Statue of Liberty. On the left is a pagoda labeled "Puck Office" and on the right is a building labeled "Tammany Hall". Among the fireworks are many faces of politicians and other prominent figures of the day, some labeled by type of firework, such as "Chicago Shower", Arthur, Grant, Conkling, Logan and Cameron; "Tumbler", Tilden; "Twister", Schurz; "The Falling Tammany Star", Kelly; "Bomb", Davis; "Junk Whizzler", Robeson; "Polar Rocket", Bennett; "Buster", Butler; and "Star Route Staggerer", Dorsey. Others shown are James G. Blaine, Henry Ward Beecher, Elizabeth Tilton(?), Thomas De Witt Talmage, and Theodore Tilton.


    Lazy Curator™ sez: Only a couple of days late on this. “Twinkler” seems to be N. Y. Mayor W. R. Grace. I’m guessing “Opper & Co.” means that a bunch of the Puck staff got in on the fun with this one.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The Fate of a Grand Idea



    by Frederick Burr Opper (1885)

    fate of a grand idea, the (1885)


    Lazy Curator sez: Hate to post-and-run, but I owe you two this week, and want to get to work on preparing the next for you right now as you click-through, zoom, and squint at the Google Books link.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Modern Tortures



    by Frederick Opper (1890)

    modern tortures (1890)


  • The Torture of the Baritone Sailor Song.

  • The Torture of the Bad After-Dinner Speech.

  • The Torture of the Whistling Fiend

  • The Torture of the Venerable Funny Story.

  • The Torture of the Back-Slapping Fiend.

  • The Torture of the Crying Baby in the Theatre.


  • Lazy Curator sez: Amazing how some of these remain modern 120-odd years later. Especially Panel #6. I like how the man on the left in Panel #4 looks ready to punch Mr. Venerable Funny Story until he sees stars.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The American Mania for Moving



    by Frederick Opper (1887)

    american mania for moving, the (1877)

    If it keeps growing, we shall soon be a Nation of Nomads.



    Lazy Curator™ sez: Self-explanatory. “Snore’s Patent Folding Bed” gives me the giggles.
    progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

    Valentines Social and Political



    by Frederick Opper (1888)

    valentines social and political (1888)


    If You Don’t See What You Want, Ask for It.



    Lazy Curator™ sez: Did I say the one I posted last year was the last of these? That’ll teach me to make such ridiculous pronouncements!

    Not transcribing these, not out of laziness but because of the incompleteness caused by the scanning. I’m sure these bound editions seemed like a good idea at the time, but they don’t make the latter-day librarian’s job very easy, especially when it comes to scanning these elaborate gatefold images. To prove I’m not totally lazy, I’ll even identify some of the personages depicted: William Chandler, W. T. Sherman, James G. Blaine, Carl Schurz, David Hill, Charles A. Dana, Joseph Pulitzer, Henry George, Whitelaw Reid (as a dairy maid!), Jay Gould, John J. Ingalls, Benjamin Butler and William Evarts (as a giraffe).
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Double Lives:



    Or, Private Pointers About Public Performers



    by Frederick Opper (1889)

    double lives or private pointers about public performers (1889)


    Lazy Curator™ sez: I’m feeling a tad under the weather today, so if you’ll forgive me, I won’t be transcribing all that tiny text. Maybe at a later date.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    “The Darkest Hour Is Just Before the Dawn.”



    by Frederick Burr Opper (1889)

    darkest hour is just before the dawn, the (1889)


    Country Editor.—It’s no use—I’m desperate! There’s no support for a live paper in this one-horse town, any how!
    Country Editor
    (twenty minutes later, writing).—Business is booming. Our public-spirited fellow-townsman, Mr. Elihu Backlots, has just left a gallon jug of prime hard cider, in payment for six months’ subscription. Thanks, Elihu.


    Posted without comment.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Long to Be Remembered



    by Frederick Opper (1886)

    long to be remembered (1886)


    Wife (returning from matinée).—Oh, it was too lovely! She had on a pale nile green silk, with bands of passementerie down the front, and the grandest diamonds you ever saw, and when she died, in the last act, she rolled over four times, and every woman in the house was crying. I never enjoyed a play so much in my life!


    Posted without comment.

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