progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

The Reform Express



The “Practical Politicians” Are Left by the Roadside



by Udo J. Keppler (1893)

reform express, the (1893)


Lazy Curator™ sez: A steam train named the Reform Express is helmed by Grover Cleveland and Walter Gresham (Sec’y of State). Shaking their fists at the train from ground level are David B. Hill, “Murphy,” “McLaughlin,” “Sheehan,” Henry Watterson, Charles A. Dana (bearing a knife marked “Spite”) and Richard Croker.

This image was featured on this Japanese steam engine site, erroneously credited as being from Judge.

The poor junior Keppler had clearly yet to step out of the shadow of his illustrious father. I suppose he had to wait for Dear Old Dad to kick the bucket before he could exert his own will and develop his own style. Isn’t that always the way?
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

Her True Knight



by Joseph Keppler (1887)

her true knight (1887)


Lazy Curator™ sez: Click through and enlarge all that damn text your own damn self!

Here we see Democratic Party Elsa being romanced by “Lohengrin” Cleveland, facing off against rival “Telramund” Hill and his advisor “Ortrud” Pulitzer. Behind them is a “Mugwump” swan and banners reading “Jacksonian Bourbons,” “Heelers and Spoilsmen” and “Reform Is a Humbug and a Fraud.”

I hate to keep obsessing on this single issue, but I had to post this to prove I wasn’t going nuts in my old age and that the elder Keppler had, in fact, depicted David Bennett Hill. He has. Here’s proof. Moving on...

Now that I’ve posted this, I can’t help but marvel at how much Elsa resembles Kate Bush.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

Where Did the Shoe Pinch?



by C. J. Taylor (1891)

where did the shoe pinch (1891)


D. B. Hill.—How dare you address to me such an insulting and impertinent communication?
Henry Watterson.—“I can not help thinking that the same words might be with propriety addressed to any Democratic aspirant by the humblest Democrat in the land.”


Lazy Curator™ sez: Here we have New York governor David B. Hill, irately confronting Henry Watterson with an issue of the New York Times dated Nov. 2, 1890 bearing the headline, “Watterson’s Letter to Gov. Hill.”

Honestly, some days I think every entry (or at least every other entry) ought to be accompanied by the sentence, “Now, let the slash fiction begin!”

The search for the fabled Joseph Keppler rendering of Hill continues...
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

Fire Protection Wanted



by Udo J. Keppler (1901)

fire protection wanted (1901)


The Democratic Phoenix: If they'd just keep that Bryan boy from playing around me with matches I wouldn't have to do this stunt every four years.


The LOC says:

Illustration shows the Democratic Party platform in flames with a donkey labeled "Democratic Party" rising from the flames as the mythological phoenix; eleven Democratic Party members have gathered around the fire to supplicate the supernatural being.


Lazy Curator™ sez: The deeper I dive into the Puck rabbit hole, the more I realize that some of my early perceptions were wrong. By the turn of the century, Udo Keppler was coming into his own, earning a style distinct from his father’s. It’s helpful to compare his illustrating style by looking at figures both men have depicted, such as David B. Hill (foreground left) and Henry Watterson (far right).

“Bryan” is a reference to perpetual Democratic presidential candidate and “free silver” advocate William Jennings Bryan (not pictured).

EDIT: You know, I might just be wrong about the elder Keppler depicting Hill. At least a recent audit hasn’t turned up anything in the Weekly Puck archive. If he did do him (get your minds out of the gutter), I haven’t come across it yet. Oh well, at least it gave me a chance to update the tags of past entries. More on that next time...
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

Untitled (Valentines for 1891)



by Frederick Opper (1891)

valentines 1891


Lazy Curator™ sez: Opper was only lavishing us with a mere four Valentines this year. I’m guessing his disaffection with Puck was beginning to show, and he had one foot out the door.

What we have here: William McKinley as “A Hayseed Hasbeen,” John James Ingalls as “An Unheeded Shrew,” William M. Evarts as “A Back-Number” and David Hill as “An Ambitious Boy.”

As usual, my title precludes me from transcribing any more text than that. Deal with it!
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

Political Personals



by Frederick Opper (1886)

political personals (1886)


Lazy Curator™ sez: I could transcribe all that text, but do you really expect me to spend the time to do so? I could identify all the depicted parties, but I’m going to make you do the work. Check the tags for hints if you must. How’s that for laziness?

On the other hand, I already have next week’s entry uploaded and ready to go. But I’m going to make you wait for it. SUFFER! [villainous laughter]
progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

Valentines Social and Political



by Frederick Opper (1888)

valentines social and political (1888)


If You Don’t See What You Want, Ask for It.



Lazy Curator™ sez: Did I say the one I posted last year was the last of these? That’ll teach me to make such ridiculous pronouncements!

Not transcribing these, not out of laziness but because of the incompleteness caused by the scanning. I’m sure these bound editions seemed like a good idea at the time, but they don’t make the latter-day librarian’s job very easy, especially when it comes to scanning these elaborate gatefold images. To prove I’m not totally lazy, I’ll even identify some of the personages depicted: William Chandler, W. T. Sherman, James G. Blaine, Carl Schurz, David Hill, Charles A. Dana, Joseph Pulitzer, Henry George, Whitelaw Reid (as a dairy maid!), Jay Gould, John J. Ingalls, Benjamin Butler and William Evarts (as a giraffe).
progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

Time to Clean Up, Boys, and Look Pretty!



by Louis Dalrymple (1891)

time to clean up boys and look pretty


A room full of 1891 contemporaries washing up. Note the roller towel (ick! I’m glad those germ magnets are pretty much a thing of the past!) marked “World’s Fair Question.” Among those seen in this image: Theodore Roosevelt (under the shower spray in the background, far right), Charles A. Dana (in center frame holding the brush marked “Sun”), Joseph Pulitzer (to Dana’s right, washing his hands), Thomas Platt (left foreground, at the leftmost washbasin), David Hill (entering with dirty hands) and William McKinley (just behind the curtain). (That could be Stephen Elkins, center frame, between Dana and Hill, but don’t quote me on that.)
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

In the Pantheon of the Sun



by Louis Dalrymple (1895)

in the pantheon of the sun (1895)


Editor Dana (enthusiastically).—There he is, fellow citizens of this glorious republic, the greatest statesman the world has ever seen, and the only thing that’s left of the Democratic Party.


As per normal, Lazy-Man Curator defers to the Library of Congress:

Print shows Charles A. Dana sitting at a desk on which a diminutive David B. Hill labeled "I am a Democract" [sic] is standing next to a large book labeled "Speeches of D.B. Hill"; in a niche in the background is a bust of Benjamin F. Butler. On July 9, 1896, at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, David B. Hill will deliver a speech that begins "I am a Democrat, but I am not a revolutionist."


The cobwebs on Butler’s bust are a nice touch.
progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

Pride Goeth Before Destruction



by J. S. Pughe (1900)

pride goeth before destruction (1900)


Richard “Boss” Croker of Tammany Hall, made to look like an inflated hot-air balloon, is attacked from behind by a man (David Hill?) bearing a javelin reading “N.Y. State Democracy.” Incidentally, for those wondering where my user icon comes from, wonder no more.

I hate to suggest that J. S. Pughe is a one-trick pony, considering the similarity of the above image to the last image I featured of his.

As usual, please note that The Weekly Puck is a public feature. Keep the comments clean, folks.

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