progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

The Reform Express



The “Practical Politicians” Are Left by the Roadside



by Udo J. Keppler (1893)

reform express, the (1893)


Lazy Curator™ sez: A steam train named the Reform Express is helmed by Grover Cleveland and Walter Gresham (Sec’y of State). Shaking their fists at the train from ground level are David B. Hill, “Murphy,” “McLaughlin,” “Sheehan,” Henry Watterson, Charles A. Dana (bearing a knife marked “Spite”) and Richard Croker.

This image was featured on this Japanese steam engine site, erroneously credited as being from Judge.

The poor junior Keppler had clearly yet to step out of the shadow of his illustrious father. I suppose he had to wait for Dear Old Dad to kick the bucket before he could exert his own will and develop his own style. Isn’t that always the way?
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (pride goeth before destruction)

The Mulligan Guard Lies, But—Surrenders



by Joseph Keppler (1884)

mulligan guard lies but surrenders, the (1884)


The LOC says:

Illustration shows an explosion at the "Claim Agency, Formerly Republican Head Quarters" with William M. Evarts peeking through the opening in the tent to survey the damage; several small kiosks labeled "Machine Republicans Meet Here, County Democracy Blaine Exchange, Tribune Blaine Organ, [and] Friends of Tammany Meet Here" have been blown over and damaged, also knocked to the ground by the blast were "Keifer, [Blaine holding a paper that states "I Claim Everything"], Logan, W. Reid, Butler, Dana, Burchard [labeled "R.R.R."], Robeson, Elkins, Dorsey," and an unidentified man lying on the ground next to bags of "Soap". On horseback, in the upper left corner, is Grover Cleveland holding a scroll labeled "Reform", and a Puck character carrying a standard labeled "Independents", among the ranks are Carl Schurz, George W. Curtis, and Henry Ward Beecher. Strewn on the ground are papers that state "I.O.U. If we win. J.G., I.O.U. Conditional on Success, C.W.F., [and] I.O.U. If you get there, J. Roach"; and several of the downed "Mulligan Guard" hold papers that state "We Still Claim", whereas Dana's paper states "I Give Up".


Lazy Curator™ sez: Bless you, Library of Congress, for enabling my laziness. I’ve had to shoulder most of the burden of research for what seems like months now.

Having said that, allow me to nit-pick their research.

The unidentified man looks like Jay Gould. I was leaning against him, on account of the I.O.U. from J.G. which suggested he was absent, and racked my brain to come up with other, prominent long-bearded men of the period it might represent. W. W. Belknap? William Mahone? Then I remembered the bags of “soap” and made the connection. Oh, that wacky 19th century slang!

I noticed that John Kelly and Hubert O. Thompson couldn’t even be bothered to show up in person. Pity, especially in the latter case, as I know how popular he is with the Weekly Puck’s readership.

Stevie Elkins is in a precarious position. I mean, it can’t compare with this image from [another publication], but it’s amusing just the same.

The eagle-eyed who were good at playing Classic Concentration™ will notice that I’m running out of order, both in the Mulligan Guards series (there’s more than just the two I posted) and in my usual Weekly Puck running order. In both cases it’s to get in a visual tribute (however backhanded—what do you want? It’s Puck!) to John Alexander Logan, what with his life’s legacy (i.e.: Memorial Day) coming up.

UPDATE: Re-scanned this classic image, probably the best we’ve had so far from the Google Books archive, or are ever likely to get. I hear you ask, “Mike, why are you dedicating so much time and effort in the pursuit of finding the perfect scan of this particular image? Hmmm? Trying to tell us something, are you?” Well...um...hey, look! It’s Hubert O. Thompson!

[runs]
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

In Sight of the Promised Land



by Bernhard Gillam (1882)

in sight of the promised land (1882)


Lazy Curator™ sez: First of all, let me apologize for the clunky seam on this one. This was the only full-sized image where both sides were in color that I could find. Image shows Grover Cleveland leading pilgrims to the Capitol, marked 1884. Some of those pictured: Charles A. Dana and Henry Watterson (blowing horns), L. Q. C. Lamar (crawling on the rock), Samuel Tilden (riding piggy-back), Allen Thurman, Thomas Bayard, John Kelly (leopard-skin is a good look for him!) and Benjamin Butler.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

Political Personals



by Frederick Opper (1886)

political personals (1886)


Lazy Curator™ sez: I could transcribe all that text, but do you really expect me to spend the time to do so? I could identify all the depicted parties, but I’m going to make you do the work. Check the tags for hints if you must. How’s that for laziness?

On the other hand, I already have next week’s entry uploaded and ready to go. But I’m going to make you wait for it. SUFFER! [villainous laughter]
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

The Pyrrhic Victory of the Mulligan Guards in Maine



by Joseph Keppler (1884)

pyrrhic victory of the mulligan guards in maine, the (1884)

“Another victory like this, and our money’s gone!”



The LOC says:

Illustration shows James G. Blaine dressed as a knight, the plumes of his helmet labeled "Speakership Record, Mulligan Letters, [and] Credit Mobilier", he holds papers labeled "Aggressive Cash Campaign", and rests his left hand on the head of W.W. Phelps who is holding a sword and a battered shield labeled "Blaines Magnetism". Whitelaw Reid, wearing a paper hat, carries a standard that states "Moral Ideas," (crossed out) "Soap and Success!" Stephen B. Elkins presents a "Report" to John A. Logan and Blaine that states "Great Victory in Maine! Blaine Vindicated! Cost $265,000". Charles A. Dana sits in the lower right corner pouring "Personal Animosity" into cannonballs labeled "Personal Animosity, Spite, Mud Bombs, [and] Malice". Frederick Douglass holds a sign labeled "Mulligan Guards Blaine's Record" that appears to have drawn considerable enemy fire. On the left, "A.M. Clapp" turns his empty pockets inside out and George M. Robeson looks at an empty cash barrel. In the background, there is action at the "Whiskey Arsenal, Fort Cleveland, Polls, [and] Fort St. John", and casualties on the battlefield.


Lazy Curator™ sez: Frederick Douglass? Well, you could have knocked me over with a feather! Of all the people I never expected to include in this feature! Although probably for the last time, so don’t blink or you’ll miss him.

Including this for the Logan, on account of the impending Memorial Day, though it’s hardly a flattering caricature (let’s face it, you just weren’t going to find that in Puck’s pages!).
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

Blundering Again



by Bernhard Gillam (1883)

blundering again (1883)


The LOC says:

Print shows a group of Democrats on a log raft that is breaking up within sight of land, with two logs labeled "New Jersey [and] New York" coming loose and drifting away; there is a small sail labeled "Democra[...] Record". Some are fighting amongst themselves, Allen G. Thurman is about to hit George Hoadly who is holding a paper labeled "Dem. Nomination for Gov. Ohio Hoadly", John Kelly is fighting with Hubert O. Thompson who is holding a knife labeled "County Dem", behind them is Alexander V. Davidson labeled "Irving Hall" and holding a knife, others seem on the brink of despair, including Abram S. Hewitt gnawing on a bone labeled "Tariff", Charles A. Dana defiant of fate, Thomas F. Bayard sitting with his elbows on his knees, Winfield Scott Hancock who appears to have succombed, Thomas Hendricks chewing on his fingers, an unidentified man searching the horizon, Henry Watterson, and Samuel J. Tilden, only Benjamin F. Butler shows any sign of hope as he points toward shore and the U.S. Capitol labeled "1884".


Lazy Curator™ sez: The “unidentified man” could be L. Q. C. Lamar, but don’t quote me on that.

Haven’t had a cartoon featuring Breakout Superstar H. O. T. in a while, so I figured I owed you one. Here’s as close to an actual photograph of the man I’ve yet found:

Behind the cut to save BW )

EDIT: Updated the scan already! Pity the sorrows of poor C. A. Dana, forever cursed to reside in the center seam of gatefold images.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

The Great Rival Advertising Shows to “Boom Up” Stocks



by Bernhard Gillam (1883)

great rival advertising shows to boom up stocks, the (1883)


The LOC says:

Print shows three "advertising" sideshows, on the left, the "Great Northern Pacific R.R. Show Patronized by the European Aristocracy" with Henry Villard as the barker and Carl Schurz playing a drum; includes portraits hanging on the side of the tent showing a "Famous German Painter engaged at a cost of $15,000!!!", a "Celebrated German Author, A Live German Baron!!, British Interests Member of Parliament, A Genuine English Lord, the real article, Bavarian General, [and] English Aristocrat". On the right is the "Great Yellowstone Park Show" with "Uncle Rufus Hatch" as barker and Charles A. Dana playing the trombone; includes portraits hanging on the side of the tent showing a "Scout, Arthur's Cabinet [Robert Todd Lincoln], Little "Phil" Sheridan, Great American General, [and] President Arthur" fishing. At center, in the background, is the "Western Union Show" with Jay Gould sitting in front of a tent labeled "Happy Family Inside". Between the sideshows are several well-dressed, serious-minded men, one labeled "Investor", considering the merits of each show before investing.
progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

Valentines Social and Political



by Frederick Opper (1888)

valentines social and political (1888)


If You Don’t See What You Want, Ask for It.



Lazy Curator™ sez: Did I say the one I posted last year was the last of these? That’ll teach me to make such ridiculous pronouncements!

Not transcribing these, not out of laziness but because of the incompleteness caused by the scanning. I’m sure these bound editions seemed like a good idea at the time, but they don’t make the latter-day librarian’s job very easy, especially when it comes to scanning these elaborate gatefold images. To prove I’m not totally lazy, I’ll even identify some of the personages depicted: William Chandler, W. T. Sherman, James G. Blaine, Carl Schurz, David Hill, Charles A. Dana, Henry Pulitzer, Henry George, Whitelaw Reid (as a dairy maid!), Jay Gould, John J. Ingalls, Benjamin Butler and William Evarts (as a giraffe).
progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

A Stir in the Roost



by Joseph Keppler (1877)

stir in the roost, a (1877)


“What! Another chicken?”



Puck, emerging from an egg with a shell marked 13 North William St., greets a coop filled with chickens resembling famous men from contemporary publishing. Among those depicted: Whitelaw Reid (Tribune), Frank Leslie, J. G. Bennett, Jr. (Herald), Charles Anderson Dana (Sun) and Thomas Nast (Harper’s Weekly).

I’ve been meaning to feature this one for a while, as it’s historically important as the cover image to the flagship issue of Puck as an English-language publication.
progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

Puck’s Fourth-of-July Picnic, 1881



by Joseph Keppler (1881)

puck's fourth-of-july picnic, 1881


Another delightfully dense image from Keppler, similar to this summer-themed one. Some of the featured picnickers include (more or less left-to-right, top-to-bottom):

  • Ulysses S. Grant (upper left, leaning on tree)

  • Carl Schurz (playing toy piano)

  • John Kelly (falling from “Try Your Weight” contraption)

  • Samuel Tilden (using “Lung Tester”)

  • David Davis (the “giant” on “Giant and Dwarf” poster)

  • William Russell Grace (pushing woman on swing)

  • Rutherford B. Hayes (in background between trees, carrying suitcases)

  • Cornelius Vanderbilt (running towards a basket marked “Free Lunch”)

  • Peter Cooper (the rightmost of the two running figures at the upper right)

  • Henry Ward Beecher (blindfolded and surrounded by women, lower left)

  • Thomas DeWitt Talmage (leftmost of the two figures leading Puck by the hand)

  • Charles A. Dana (at the page break, with sailor’s hat and cane)

  • Whitelaw Reid (to Dana’s immediate right, with flowered hat, umbrella and cigarette)

  • James Garfield (on the left side of teeter-totter)

  • Roscoe Conkling (being catapulted from the right end of the teeter-totter)

  • Jay Gould (rightmost of the two figures playing cards, wearing black top hat)

  • Benjamin Butler (lower right, flirting with woman)
  • progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Change Cars! This Train Has Stopped Running for Good!



    by Frederick Opper (1886)

    change cars (1886)


    Puck acts as a streetcar brakeman on the Reform Line, calling for the occupants of the Old Spoils System Line—all prominent journalists of the time—to off-board. Lazy Curator™ laments the dearth of LOC entry to consult, but can positively identify Whitelaw Reid (standing, far left), Henry Pulitzer (seated, left foreground, with head turned), Murat Halstead (seated, center background, next to broken boiler), Cyrus Field (seated, second from right) and Charles A. Dana (asleep, far right).

    More “spoils system”...um...“fun”

    In case you have doubts that this posting is seasonally appropriate, do remember a) it was originally published in December and b) Dana rather looks like Santa Claus here.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The Presidential Recruiting Office



    by Bernhard Gillam (1884)

    presidential recruiting office, the (1884)


    The LOC says:

    Illustration shows the interior of a recruiting office for the presidency with Uncle Sam and Puck examining potential recruits against a height chart labeled, from low to high, "Notoriety, Popularity, Capability, Honesty, [and at the top] Statesmanship"; a number of men, in various states of undress, have been rejected for a variety of reasons, "Evarts Too Long-Winded, [U.S. Grant] Retired, [Conkling] Too Pigeon-Breasted, [Thomas C. Platt] Me Too Little, Mahone Must be Readjusted, J.B. Rejected Too Crooked, Dana Rejected - Too Shortsighted, [Logan] Grammar Feeble, [Arthur] Rejected No Backbone, [Davis] Short Winded, Sherman Bloody Shirt Mania, [Kelly] Pig-Headed, Payne Oil on the Brain, Randall Protection Madness, Bayard Unstable, [Tilden] Rejected Cipher Catarrh, [and] B[utler] Can't See Straight". Five tall men, "Admitted to the Competition", standing on the right, are "Hewitt, Carlisle, Morrison, Lincoln [and] Edmunds O.K."


    Lazy Curator sez: From before Grover Cleveland threw his hat into the ring? Also: “must be readjusted”? Ha ha! I get it! Incidentally, Lincoln does indeed refer to Robert Todd Lincoln, son of Honest Abe.

    I owe you two again this week. I’ll try to work on the next one tomorrow.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    A Hopeless Undertaking



    by Frederick Opper (1887)

    hopeless undertaking, a (1887)


    Charles A. Dana attempts to blow out a gaslight marked “Civil Service Reform Gas,” ignoring the sign reading, “Notice! This gas can be neither turned off nor blown out. Grover Cleveland, Manager, U.S. Hotel.”

    Love the stripey socks.

    More gaslight humour (again, from Opper).

    UPDATE: identified more of the participants in the 1884 Thanksgiving dinner. You’re welcome.
    progbear: Major-General Progbear (Default)

    Time to Clean Up, Boys, and Look Pretty!



    by Louis Dalrymple (1891)

    time to clean up boys and look pretty


    A room full of 1891 contemporaries washing up. Note the roller towel (ick! I’m glad those germ magnets are pretty much a thing of the past!) marked “World’s Fair Question.” Among those seen in this image: Theodore Roosevelt (under the shower spray in the background, far right), Charles A. Dana (in center frame holding the brush marked “Sun”), Carl Schurz (to Dana’s right, washing his hands), Thomas Platt (left foreground, at the leftmost washbasin), David Hill (entering with dirty hands) and William McKinley (just behind the curtain).
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Easing Her Last Days



    by Udo J. Keppler (1893)

     photo easingherlastdays1893_zps3118d7e1.jpg


    Charles A. Dana seems to be euthanizing Old Lady G.O.P. here with a syringe marked “Sun Morning.” At her feet, a box of tubes marked “False and Misleading Reports About the Administration.”

    I believe the cat is there just for show.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    In the Pantheon of the Sun



    by Louis Dalrymple (1895)

     photo inthepantheonofthesun1895_zps8a802f8e.jpg


    Editor Dana (enthusiastically).—There he is, fellow citizens of this glorious republic, the greatest statesman the world has ever seen, and the only thing that’s left of the Democratic Party.


    As per normal, Lazy-Man Curator defers to the Library of Congress:

    Print shows Charles A. Dana sitting at a desk on which a diminutive David B. Hill labeled "I am a Democract" [sic] is standing next to a large book labeled "Speeches of D.B. Hill"; in a niche in the background is a bust of Benjamin F. Butler. On July 9, 1896, at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, David B. Hill will deliver a speech that begins "I am a Democrat, but I am not a revolutionist."


    The cobwebs on Butler’s bust are a nice touch.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The Republican Presidential Candidate Now on View



    by J. A. Wales (1880)

    The Republican Presidential Candidate Now on View (1880)


    Charles A. Dana:—“Come and see! Two cents a sight! Great Sun Microscope! Magnifies 100,000,000,000 Diameters!”


    The microscope magnifies a slide of James Garfield’s alleged faults, as a man with donkey ears peers through the lens. While a Democratic-leaning publication, Puck supported Garfield, largely because he opposed the “Stalwart” wing of the Republican party supported by Roscoe Conkling and Ulysses S. Grant (they patronized Chester A. Arthur, who became president by default after Garfield’s death). Thus they were quick to point out obvious partisan hypocrisy such as this.

    Then again, this could show a bit of Wales becoming increasingly disgruntled. Soon, he would jump ship and form his own rival publication, Judge (the drama between Keppler and the ex-staff that split to start Judge was very public. Beloved caricaturist Bernard Gilliam was eventually lured away from Puck by Wales). Then again again, Dana continued to be a frequent Puck target long after Wales left the scene.

    Another Dana-centric image
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Barred Out From the Promised Land



    by Bernard Gilliam (1885)

    Barred Out From the Promised Land (1885)


    Disappointed Democratic Moses: “Was It Worth Going Through So Much to Get So Little?”


    Clearly a satire of the breakdown of the spoils system, the broken tablet reading, “Old Commandments: Thou Shalt Divide Up the Spoils,” is a dead giveaway (and the Roman numerals are a nice touch). The star, as usual, of this image is Tammany’s John Kelly (second from right in the foreground, with arms folded), fronting a host of other disappointed parties on a hill above the Cleveland White House. One could think of it as a sequel to this image. Also of note in this image: journalist Charles A. Dana (top center, to the right of the page break) and Weekly Puck Breakout Superstar Hubert O. Thompson (front row, to the left of the page break).

    I like how even lesser Gilliam, like this, is still something most artists would kill to have something so high-quality just once in their career. Mind-boggling, as usual.
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    The Olympus of Corruption



    “Apollo Strikes the Lyre and Charms the Gods”



    by Bernard Gilliam (1884)

    The Olympus of Corruption (1884)


    Another commemoration of James G. Blaine’s failed bid for the presidency, and another gorgeous, detailed gatefold artwork courtesy of the immensely talented Gilliam.

    Blaine plays a lyre marked “N.Y. Tribune” (with a figurehead resembling Whitelaw Reid), his sack of music filled with “lies.”

    Among those depicted: Jay Gould as Jupiter, George Robeson as Neptune (bearing a basket of dead fish marked “Navy Jobs”), Charles A. Dana as Minerva (holding a jar of ink labelled “Spite”), J. Warren Keifer as Hercules, John Logan as Mars and Ben Butler as Venus. Stephen Dorsey and Thomas Brady (see “Star Route Scandal”) appear as Raphael cherubs.

    Note Blaine’s tattoos. Not to mention that Logan is obviously flirting with Butler. Now that was pushing the envelope for 1884!
    progbear: Pride Goeth Before Destruction (1900) (Boss Croker inflated)

    Thanksgiving Day, 1884



    by Bernard Gilliam (1884)



    “Let Us Be Thankful!”



    Grover Cleveland walks past carrying a turkey marked “Presidency” as his political rivals dine on crow. Those I can identify definitively: James Blaine (seated, far left), George Robeson (seated, behind table, holding knife and fork), Stephen W. Dorsey (standing, behind Robeson), William Mahone (standing—yes, really—to the left of Dorsey), Henry Cabot Lodge (seated, between Blaine and Robeson), Charles A. Dana (seated, far right), Ben Butler (seated, right foreground), Cyrus Field (standing, with elbow out of window), Thomas Platt (standing, to the left of Field) and Roscoe Conkling (peering through the doorway). I believe the dog represents John Kelly. Jay Gould can be seen leaning out of a window across the street bearing a sign reading “My congratulations.”

    I went out of my usual running order to force this one because it was seasonally appropriate. In other words: two “comic-y” panels over the next two weeks.

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